Wine brands – Vini Vert http://vinivert.com/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 23:01:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://vinivert.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-5-120x120.png Wine brands – Vini Vert http://vinivert.com/ 32 32 Authentic Wine Brands – Winners of BEST MARKETING AWARD at the 29th Belmont & Western Australian Small Business Awards https://vinivert.com/authentic-wine-brands-winners-of-best-marketing-award-at-the-29th-belmont-western-australian-small-business-awards/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 23:01:38 +0000 https://vinivert.com/authentic-wine-brands-winners-of-best-marketing-award-at-the-29th-belmont-western-australian-small-business-awards/ In front of an audience of over 360 attendees, Authentic Wine Brands was one of many Western Australian Small Business winners in the 29e Belmont & Western Australian Small Business Awards 2022 on Wednesday 26e October 2022. Held in the ballroom of the Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre, the ‘Night of Stars’ event celebrated excellence […]]]>

In front of an audience of over 360 attendees, Authentic Wine Brands was one of many Western Australian Small Business winners in the 29e Belmont & Western Australian Small Business Awards 2022 on Wednesday 26e October 2022. Held in the ballroom of the Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre, the ‘Night of Stars’ event celebrated excellence in business and community achievement

Welcoming remarks were delivered by the Mayor of the City of Belmont, Cr Phil Marks, along with our MCs for the evening, MP for Belmont, Cassie Rowe MLA, and Belmont BEC Inc. Boss Louise Percy. VIP guests included: MP for South Perth, Geoff Baker MLA; Consul General of India, Perth, Amarjeet Singh Takhi; Consul (Trade, Consular and Head of Chancery) Consulate General of India in Perth, Naresh Sharma; Honorary Consul of the Slovak Republic in Western Australia Paul Faix, President Belmont BEC, CEO Fortix; City of Belmont, Deputy Mayor Cr Robert Rossi, JP, Cr Bernie Ryan, Cr Jenny Davis, Cr Natalie Carter, Cr Deb Sessions; Australian Local Government Womens Association WA, President, Cr Chontelle Stone, Town of Cockburn; Textile Clothing Footwear Resource Center of WA Inc., President, Irving Lane; Hong Kong Australia Business Association WA, President, Winnie Lai Hadad; AusIndustry WA, Brett Duane; BPW Australia, Helen Toon; BPW WA, former chair Kate Waters; BPW Belmont, Shirley Lancaster; Rotary International – District 9465 WA, former District Governor Jodie Sparks; Rotary Club of Ascot, President, Dianne Reed; Belmont Rotary Teresa Turnbull; Welshpool Rotary Terry Rush; AFG Young Leaders, President, Maria Aziz; National Chamber of Exporters of Sri Lanka, Kapila De Silva.

Entertainment was provided by Kaylene Taylor, with Welcome to Country by Daniel Garlett. The WA Designer Showcase fashion show featured stunning local designs from CIZZY Bridal Australia, Silver Star Designs, Jilalga Designs, Afrojordan Boutique and Miss Scarlett.

Founder and owner of Authentic Wine Brands, Mark Leake, has worked in the hospitality industry for over 20 years, establishing Authentic Wine Brands to represent and build brands with soul, brands that have a story and are authentic in their quality , their mission and their delivery. . With a strong network both locally and nationally, over the past 12 months Authentic Wine Brands has provided strong representation for many of their brands as they entered the recovery phase from the COVID-19 pandemic. 19.

The Best Marketing award is backed by Westways Visual Communication – a diverse graphic design studio and leading print provider whose goal has been to make businesses stand out since 1994; and A Team Printing – Perth’s commercial printing experts, offering high quality printing and design services on a wide range of media.

CEO Carol Hanlon said, “Now in her 29e year, our Small Business Awards are an exciting event on the calendar that provide well-deserved recognition to Western Australian businesses that strive for excellence in business and community achievement. We sincerely thank the invaluable support of our category sponsors who make this incredible small business event possible, especially our title sponsor, the City of Belmont, for their long-term support. »

For more details on all the winners of the 29e Belmont & Western Australian Small Business Awards 2022 Tour www.belmontbec.com/price

Video presentation of the award https://vimeo.com/769289444

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13 Best Non-Alcoholic Wine Brands You Can Buy https://vinivert.com/13-best-non-alcoholic-wine-brands-you-can-buy/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 14:26:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/13-best-non-alcoholic-wine-brands-you-can-buy/ Having seen the detrimental impact alcohol can have on families and communities, Moa Gürbüzer, a former social worker, started Oddbird with the aim of proving that good wine doesn’t need to be alcoholic. The key to this effort was to develop a complex taste, achieved with minimal processing. It’s a challenge that many non-alcoholic wine […]]]>

Having seen the detrimental impact alcohol can have on families and communities, Moa Gürbüzer, a former social worker, started Oddbird with the aim of proving that good wine doesn’t need to be alcoholic. The key to this effort was to develop a complex taste, achieved with minimal processing. It’s a challenge that many non-alcoholic wine producers have faced, according to Wine Folly, with the feeling that there is little choice but to use alcohol extraction methods that destroy the delicate taste of wine.

According to a press release from Oddbird, the company manages to avoid destroying the flavor of wine by removing the alcohol via a patented method. Although the details are unknown, it involves vacuum distillation, a process that separates compounds based on differences in boiling points, according to Busch.

Oddbird is clearly onto something, with the company’s products tasting significantly better than other non-alcoholic wines, as noted by Christine Parkinson, founder of no/low beverage consultancy Brimful Drinks. In an interview with Drinks Retailing, she said: “Until now, most non-alcoholic wines have been based on entry-level alcoholic wines. The rise of specialized start-ups is changing this landscape, and better quality is the result. For example, the Oddbird range. Their wines are drier and more expressive than most, and they push the boundaries. Their two reds (Oddbird Low Intervention Organic Red and Domaine de la Prade Organic) are good, and their sparkling rosé is currently the best available. .”

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The 15 Best Champagne Brands in 2022 https://vinivert.com/the-15-best-champagne-brands-in-2022/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 19:38:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/the-15-best-champagne-brands-in-2022/ wilpunt When there’s something worth celebrating, is there anything better than breaking out a bottle of champagne? All about it – popping the cork, tinkling those pretty flutes, saying “cheers” and of course, drinking the festive bubbly – makes the celebration so memorable. Whether it’s watching the ball drop on New Year’s Eve, celebrating an […]]]>

wilpunt

When there’s something worth celebrating, is there anything better than breaking out a bottle of champagne? All about it – popping the cork, tinkling those pretty flutes, saying “cheers” and of course, drinking the festive bubbly – makes the celebration so memorable. Whether it’s watching the ball drop on New Year’s Eve, celebrating an incredible new event in life, or simply enjoying a fun brunch with endless mimosas, these moments call for the best brands of champagne.

Our top picks

However, not all bottles of chilled bubbles are created equal. While prosecco, cava and other sparkling wines are delicious on their own, there’s something about the rounded flavor and distinct bubbles of the “champenoise method” that makes it even more special. That’s why we’re here to help you recap the best champagnes, so you know exactly where to go when you have a reason to celebrate. They all taste amazing on their own when toasting, while pairing well with New Year’s Eve appetizers and charcuterie boards.

The following list remains fairly faithful to the official French position that only sparkling wines made in Champagne in France can be called champagne. But, considering the quality of several sparkling wines in other regions of the world, we have included some alternatives. If this designation really matters to you, don’t worry! We have marked them accordingly. No matter which one you decide to open, rest assured that they will all truly make your celebration special. Now get ready to pop that cork and celebrate. Cheers!

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1

Editor’s Choice

Veuve Clicquot Brut NV Champagne

2

Better madness

Champagne Dom Perignon Brut

3

Best budget

Nicolas Feuillatte Blue Label Brut

4

Best value

Taittinger Brut La Francaise Champagne NV

5

Ideal for food and wine pairings

Bollinger Special Cuvée Brut Aÿ Champagne

6

Best rosé

Moët & Chandon Imperial Rosé

seven

Best off-dry

Laurent-Perrier Harmony Demi-Sec Champagne NV

8

Best blanc de blanc

Ruinart Blanc De Blancs SA

9

The most gift

Champagne Box Louis Roederer Collection 242

ten

Ideal for celebrations

Krug Grande Cuvée Brut Champagne NV

11

Ideal for parties

Pol Roger Brut

12

Best organic

Lanson Le Green Label Bio

13

Best American Option

Vintage Brut Argyle

14

Best Italian option

Ferrari Trento Brut

15

Ideal for mimosas

Champagne Pommery Brut Royal NV

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Constellation Brands sells its wine brands to The Wine Group https://vinivert.com/constellation-brands-sells-its-wine-brands-to-the-wine-group/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 13:08:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/constellation-brands-sells-its-wine-brands-to-the-wine-group/ Constellation Brands divested the majority of its popular and consumer wines and spirits portfolio in 2021, underscoring its strategy of focusing primarily on fine wines and premium craft spirits. (E. & J. Gallo Winery won wines mostly retail priced at $11 and under for $810 million in February 2021). Now, the additional divestiture to California-based […]]]>

Constellation Brands divested the majority of its popular and consumer wines and spirits portfolio in 2021, underscoring its strategy of focusing primarily on fine wines and premium craft spirits. (E. & J. Gallo Winery won wines mostly retail priced at $11 and under for $810 million in February 2021).

Now, the additional divestiture to California-based The Wine Group (whose value has not been disclosed) leaves Constellation Brands with “a more focused set of leading, powerful brands aligned with consumer preferences”, spanning consumer wines, premium, fine wines and craft spirits. segments.

Focus on The Prisoner, Kim Crawford and more

Constellation Brands’ wine portfolio is now centered on Meiomi, Kim Crawford, The Prisoner Wine Company, Robert Mondavi family of brands, High West Whiskey, Casa Noble Tequila, Schrader Cellars, Double Diamond, To Kalon Vineyard Company, SIMI, My Favorite Neighbor portfolio of brands, Lingua Franca, Nelson’s Green Brier and others.

“A key driver of our success has been our consistent focus on consumer preferences, including long-term consumer-led premiumization trends, and our agility in our approach to staying ahead of the changing market dynamics,​ said Robert Hanson, Executive Vice President and President, Wines and Spirits Division.

“Over the past three years, we have transformed into a premium wine and spirits division with intentional and strategic consumer actions and are evolving our business to become a leading global portfolio of premium/fine wines and craft spirits.

“This transaction [with The Wine Company] will allow us to focus and reorient our portfolio towards the high end, positioning us to continue to deliver industry-leading growth and shareholder value with the right portfolio for our ambitions.

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Constellation Brands sells its wine brands to The Wine Group https://vinivert.com/constellation-brands-sells-its-wine-brands-to-the-wine-group-2/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/constellation-brands-sells-its-wine-brands-to-the-wine-group-2/ Constellation Brands divested the majority of its popular and consumer wine and spirits portfolio in 2021, underscoring its strategy of focusing primarily on fine wines and premium craft spirits. (E. & J. Gallo Winery won wines mostly retail priced at $11 and under for $810 million in February 2021). Now, the additional divestiture to California-based […]]]>

Constellation Brands divested the majority of its popular and consumer wine and spirits portfolio in 2021, underscoring its strategy of focusing primarily on fine wines and premium craft spirits. (E. & J. Gallo Winery won wines mostly retail priced at $11 and under for $810 million in February 2021).

Now, the additional divestiture to California-based The Wine Group (whose value has not been disclosed) leaves Constellation Brands with “a more focused set of leading, powerful brands aligned with consumer preferences”, spanning consumer wines, premium, fine wines and craft spirits. segments.

Focus on The Prisoner, Kim Crawford and more

Constellation Brands’ wine portfolio now centers on Meiomi, Kim Crawford, The Prisoner Wine Company, Robert Mondavi family of brands, High West Whiskey, Casa Noble Tequila, Schrader Cellars, Double Diamond, To Kalon Vineyard Company, SIMI, My Favorite Neighbor portfolio of brands, Lingua Franca, Nelson’s Green Brier and others.

“A key driver of our success has been our consistent focus on consumer preferences, including long-term consumer-led premiumization trends, and our agility in our approach to staying ahead of the game. changing market dynamics,​ said Robert Hanson, Executive Vice President and President, Wines and Spirits Division.

“Over the past three years, we have transformed into a premium wine and spirits division with intentional and strategic consumer actions and are evolving our business to become a leading global portfolio of premium/fine wines and spirits. artisanal.

“This operation [with The Wine Company] will enable us to focus and reorient our portfolio towards the high end, positioning us to continue to deliver industry-leading growth and shareholder value with the right portfolio for our ambitions.

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Constellation offers more wine brands at great prices https://vinivert.com/constellation-offers-more-wine-brands-at-great-prices/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 18:04:56 +0000 https://vinivert.com/constellation-offers-more-wine-brands-at-great-prices/ The beverage giant wants to compete in the premium sector for wines and spirits. © Constellation Brands | The global beverage company is offloading another slice of wine brands in a shift in strategic direction. Cheap wine is bad business. Look no further than Constellation Brands’ dramatic wine reduction in the past three years alone, […]]]>

The beverage giant wants to compete in the premium sector for wines and spirits.

© Constellation Brands | The global beverage company is offloading another slice of wine brands in a shift in strategic direction.

Cheap wine is bad business. Look no further than Constellation Brands’ dramatic wine reduction in the past three years alone, which continued this week as it sold more lower-end brands.

In 2009, Constellation was the largest wine company in the world according to Wine Business Monthly. It has sold 104 million cases of wine worldwide per year (43 million domestically) after a buying spree that began with Robert Mondavi Winery. At the time, Constellation wanted every wine brand possible.

As of February 2019, Constellation was still the third-largest wine sales company in the United States with around 50 million cases per year, behind Gallo and The Wine Group.

Not anymore. Constellation is a publicly traded company, so its moves are a great harbinger of the near future. And right now, Constellation says spirits and cannabis have a better future than cheap wine.

By February 2022, Constellation had fallen to fifth in national wine sales with just 15 million cases sold. The company has reduced its wine production by more than two-thirds in just three years.

It will get even smaller after selling its brands Cooper & Thief (Bourbon barrel-aged wines), 7 Moons, The Dreaming Tree, Charles Smith Wines and Monkey Bay this week to the aforementioned Wine Group. You and I don’t drink these wines. (Well, I don’t know.) But business trend is important.

In other words: Constellation’s cannabis investment has cost it $1.06 billion in losses so far this year – $1.06 billion! – but Constellation is not selling its shares in the cannabis business. Cheap wine brands, however, are the product of the last decade.

Changing tastes

How different from 15 years ago. Constellation became the largest wine company in the world after buying Robert Mondavi Winery, Vincor and Beam Wine Estates in three years. In a 2009 interview with Wine Business Monthly, Jay Wright, then president of Constellation, said, “We see the heart of the wine industry being wines that retail for $5 to $15, so that’s the core of our strength – this is where we lead and where we see our leadership position expanding.”

In a decade, Americans have fallen in love with wines under $11. Sales have been plummeting for years and Constellation moves with the times, like a savvy public company does.

Here is the public statement Constellation released this week: “Constellation has divested the majority of its popular and consumer wine and spirits portfolio in 2021 and is focused on competing primarily in the premium and fine wine and spirits segments. artisanal.”

Constellation has also reduced its beer portfolio to Mexican brands Corona and Modelo. In 2015, Constellation paid $1 billion for Ballast Point craft beer. But craft beer isn’t the future either, apparently, and in 2019 Constellation sold the brand for less than $100 million, according to Credit Suisse.

Constellation needs to sell a lot of Meiomi Pinot Noir to continue suffering those billion dollar losses.

So what is the future? Don’t be surprised if Constellation buys more brands of spirits. He has High West whiskey, Svedka vodka and Casa Noble tequila, but none of them are the huge global success he is looking for. There’s plenty of room for growth there: as far as I can tell from its website, Constellation owns several brands of so-called craft American whiskey, but doesn’t own any brands that specifically make gin, rum, or spirits. aperitif (its brandy producer Copper & Kings also makes gin.) Of course, that says a lot about Constellation’s belief in these spirits.

And Constellation is not made with wine. Sommeliers will grumble but Meiomi and The Prisoner are two of the most popular wine brands in the United States. Constellation won’t let enophiles complain about too much residual sugar in its results. Americans love sweet wines that claim they’re dry, and Constellation has figured out how to get consumers to spend $50 instead of $5 on them. His Kim Crawford brand is big because New Zealand wines are still big.

Constellation bought Lingua Franca earlier this year: a small, premium brand of chardonnay from Oregon that wouldn’t have been on the company’s radar 10 years ago. He still runs Robert Mondavi Winery, and he makes more money for the same grapes by putting some of them in Schrader, which he bought in 2017. However, Constellation doesn’t want you to know he owns Schrader: the brand is not listed on the company’s website. The idea is probably to keep the brand from losing its Parker-era 100-point shine.

Constellation’s disinterest in cheap wine means more space at the bottom of the shelf for The Wine Group, a quietly efficient producer originally launched by executives of Coca-Cola’s failed entry into the wine business. wine in the 1970s. The Wine Group made its own high-end forays with Benziger and Imagery, but like Gallo – which is also still in the bargain wine business – it is privately owned, so it has no to respond to shareholders.

One wonders if a global recession could make cheap wine popular again and fill the accounts of Gallo and The Wine Group with truckloads of pennies. If so, Constellation can always pivot and take advantage of it, because that’s what it does.

But in the short term, The Dreaming Tree was taken down.

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Wine Intelligence: caution recommended for wine brands https://vinivert.com/wine-intelligence-caution-recommended-for-wine-brands/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 22:46:41 +0000 https://vinivert.com/wine-intelligence-caution-recommended-for-wine-brands/ Market analysts, Wine Intelligence, believe that “global wine now faces more challenges in 2022 than it did during the immediate impacts of COVID in 2020 and 2021”. Wine Intelligence described a “perfect storm” of inflation, reduced access to inputs, labor shortages, currency volatility and supply chain disruptions, as well as “tariff wars” and real wars. […]]]>

Market analysts, Wine Intelligence, believe that “global wine now faces more challenges in 2022 than it did during the immediate impacts of COVID in 2020 and 2021”.

Wine Intelligence described a “perfect storm” of inflation, reduced access to inputs, labor shortages, currency volatility and supply chain disruptions, as well as “tariff wars” and real wars.

The combination of these conditions means that the relative stability of the past three decades, which allowed the wine industry “to become a truly global business platform”, is – for now – over.

However, this global expansion has given way to increased ‘localism’ during the pandemic lockdown era, with wine drinkers in Australia, Canada, the US and Germany all turning to locally produced wines. and turning away from imported wines.

In 2020, the net percentage of Australian consumers buying more domestic wine increased by 31%, followed by a 39% increase in 2021. While the net percentage of drinkers buying more imported wine fell by 16% over the two years. So the suggestion is that even if conditions abroad are not optimal, producers can be rewarded for focusing on the domestic market.

And analysts believe there are some steps wine companies can take to protect themselves from the worst effects of the current uncertainty.

Successful wine companies in 2022 will be those that develop a ruthless and pragmatic approach to their supply chains, product portfolios and market focus,” the report states.

“Shorter supply chains will benefit from longer supply chains, as will national and local markets. Costs that seem unnecessary will be dropped; innovations with weak business cases or high start-up costs will be killed.

Although there is growing localism in the market, Wine Intelligence believes this approach could have global benefits for wine brands, including in overseas markets.

“This pragmatic and ruthless attitude may not translate into shrinking export markets – in fact, companies with a wider range of export markets may benefit from a portfolio effect that hedges their exposure if one of these markets suddenly deteriorates due to tariffs, economic crises or war.’

Wine Intelligence has previously suggested that lessons from the pandemic can be very useful to wine producers.

In this report, Wine Intelligence states that wine producers would do well to make safe bets, noting that “known and trusted wine brands will increasingly be what [consumers] are looking for.

“The more well-known and trusted the brand, the more likely the brand will continue to be purchased as inflation fuels higher prices, forcing consumers to seek more value,” the analysts continue.

“Innovation – especially in sustainable and not/weak wines -[is[likelytosupporttoplinevenuegrowthinthemediumtolongtermtheprimarydriverofwinebusinessreportssuccesswillcomefrommanagingcostsofdistributionand’safe”brandsconcluded[estsusceptibledesoutenirlacroissanceduchiffred’affairesàmoyenetlongtermeleprincipalmoteurdusuccèsdel’industrieduvinviendradelagestiondescoûtsdeladistributionetdesmarques”sûres””conclutlerapport[is[likelytosupporttoplinerevenuegrowthinthemediumtolongtermtheprimarydriverofwinebusinesssuccesswillcomefrommanagingcostsdistributionand‘safe’brands’thereportconcludes

Read the full analysis here.

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The rise of wine brands and local wineries in India https://vinivert.com/the-rise-of-wine-brands-and-local-wineries-in-india/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 12:13:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/the-rise-of-wine-brands-and-local-wineries-in-india/ As young Indians seek accessibility, affordability and sustainability in their wine choices, local brands and wineries are responding, eliminating snobbery with cans, easy-drinking spritzers and Syrah-flushed cheese. As young Indians seek accessibility, affordability and sustainability in their wine choices, local brands and wineries are responding, eliminating snobbery with cans, easy-drinking spritzers and Syrah-flushed cheese. Indian […]]]>

As young Indians seek accessibility, affordability and sustainability in their wine choices, local brands and wineries are responding, eliminating snobbery with cans, easy-drinking spritzers and Syrah-flushed cheese.

As young Indians seek accessibility, affordability and sustainability in their wine choices, local brands and wineries are responding, eliminating snobbery with cans, easy-drinking spritzers and Syrah-flushed cheese.

Indian wines are maturing, and how. Indian viticulture has seen a resurgence during the pandemic as consumers explored wines across categories and price ranges, to drink on their couches during lockdowns, and then, during last year’s home dine-in flurries. .

As brands innovate to attract new consumers, with pandemic restrictions lifted across the country, wine sales have seen a surge, which is good news for an industry that thrives on festive occasions. With a renaissance in rosé, a focus on sustainability and a growing base of enthusiastic consumers, the industry is expected to grow by $274 million by 2026, growing 29.3% year-over-year in 2022, according to a recent report by Technavio, a global group. research and consulting company. “Wine consumption in retail and at home has seen a steady increase over the past two years; currently, nearly 3/4 of our sales are off-trade, and only 1/4 is on-trade,” says Chaitanya Rathi, COO, Sula Vineyards headquartered in Nashik.

Locked up with wine

At Fratelli Wines, based in Akluj, Maharashtra, in-state home delivery pushed sales during the 2020-21 lockdowns, but, “once the stores opened, we saw people in all walks of life, preferring browse wine selections and are back in department stores,” says Jayanth Bharathi, DGM, Marketing, Fratelli Wines. The All India Wine Producers Association, led by Jagdish Holkar, has benefited from the streamlining of excise taxes and duties in Maharashtra and West Bengal, but the industry wants a separate category for wine in the excise lexicon.

Sparkling Rose Noi

Sparkling Rose Noi

“Wine can be removed from the Indian Made Foreign Liquor (IMFL) category, and giving us a separate fork will be good for business. Currently, the majority of our sales come from Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru and the state of Goa, but breaking down interstate barriers will also be key to making Chennai, Hyderabad, Kolkata and other cities great wine markets.” , adds Holkar.

Sonal Holland, a Master of Wine and founder of the Sonal Holland Wine Academy, which offers online courses in wine appreciation and education, is excited about the outlook for the industry in 2022. India’s wine industry relied on international tourists to drive consumption, but that’s changing. There is also a 200% increase in wine education course enrollment among Indian consumers. Single-serve wines are popular now, easy to pack and enjoy. We are also seeing an increase in demand for rosé, the fastest growing category in the market. Once considered a women’s brunch staple, rosé is now a gender-neutral drink of choice in its still or sparkling variant,” she says.

Fratelli Wines has spent the past two years, during the pandemic, focusing on wine education within the hospitality industry in Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities. Gaurav Sekhri, MD of Fratelli Wines, says that he too noticed that the rosé was flying off the shelves. “First-time drinkers usually start with white wines, as they are easier on the palate, and reds with their tannins offer a drier mouthfeel. Rosé goes well with the accessibility of a white and the aromatic complexity of a red. Our Shiraz Rose at ₹800 and M/S Rose at ₹1,250 (Maharashtra) were very popular.

Gregoire Vardein-Sula

Gregoire Vardein-Sula

The brand’s Noi Sparkling Rosé (₹980 in Maharashtra) in a blush decorative bottle, launched in early 2022, has been doing great business. The company’s vertical Tilt sold in single-serve cans – in its Red White, Sparkling, Sparkling Rosé and Noi Spritzer variants is popular for all-day drinking – lighter than a bottle and lighter on the pocket too, at from ₹180. “Spritzers with 8% ABV (the amount of alcohol in a drink by volume) are lighter than wines and great on their own or even mixed with gin or vodka,” adds Sekhri.

The art of aging

Grover Zampa, one of the oldest winemakers in the country, with vineyards in Nandi Hills, Karnataka and Nashik, Maharashtra, weathered the pandemic with the launch of his Signet Collection in December 2021, a range of premium aged red wines in traditional European ships, one first for winemakers. Signet is India’s first range of wines to be aged in vats, amphorae (two-handled jars with a neck narrower than the body, used as decanters in ancient Greece) and concrete vats. While the brand uses Italian steel tanks for its wine processing, the Signet range uses different earthy materials traditionally used in Europe, which interact differently with wine, providing unique mouthfeel and tasting notes.

Bringing wines to the table during the pandemic has been an uphill climb, with pandemic restrictions during the harvest season from April to June in 2020 and imports from special aging vessels suspended. “Wine being a living liquid, we had to be careful about the time it spent in the vats and bottles, letting the sommeliers do their part as we faced the logistical challenges,” says Sumit Jaiswal, AVP, Marketing and EXIM , Grover Zampa .

Signet Spectrum is a dry red wine: a blend of Shiraz, Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet, Franc and Muscat grapes, all hand-picked from the brand’s vineyards, fermented and aged for 12 months in concrete vats in egg shape. Signet Shiraz (Amphora), was fermented and aged for 12 months in terracotta amphoras. The porous structure of terracotta clay allows for micro-oxygenation which helps soften tannins, resulting in a deep, rich structure without added flavors. Other wines under the Signet umbrella are fermented for 12 months in 2,000 liter and 1,000 liter French oak vats (large wooden vats, popular in France’s Rhone Valley, significantly larger than casks typical oak barrels), Signet Shiraz (24-month-old French barrels) is aged in 225-litre French oak barrels for 24 months and 12 months in bottle.

Nikhil Agarwal, Sommelier and Founder, All Things Nice, opines, “Indian wineries offer high-quality premium wines, and the Signet is very impressive, with the kind of treatment it has received at Grover. Zampah.

Rasa by Sula

Rasa by Sula

2021 also saw the launch of Rasa from Sula Vineyards in Nashik. Sula, inspired by founder Rajeev Samant’s mother, Sulabha, was established in 1999. While Rasa has been around since 2007-08, with brands Dindori, The Source and its classics, “with Rasa in September 2021, we went with a revamp – from identity to winemaking. We are currently working to make the three varietals – Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Zinfandel, available across India,” says Grégoire Verdin – Global Brand Ambassador – AVP Tastings and Marketing, Sula Wines With a significant increase in D2C (direct to consumer) sales, Sula Wines is optimistic about its new consumers, “Many Indians have rediscovered Indian wines due to the shortage of imports, and they have realized that wines Indian ones are as good and quite often better than imported ones.

As the wine lifestyle appeals to rising young oenophiles, brands like Fratelli are augmenting the wine experience with Asia’s first selection of wine-inspired cheeses, created in collaboration with artisan cheese brand Käse based in Chennai. The A2 cow’s milk cheese, is wrapped in Sangiovese vine leaves or rinsed in wine-infused brine, then aged. “While we had fabulous reception for our first batch of wine-inspired cheeses, we are excited about the new launches,” says Sekhri. In addition to the gusto rinsed syrah, sunburst rinsed chenin and sangiovese leaf aged cheddar, the recently launched barrel aged feta and smoked provolone are all available separately at ₹465 for 150 grams, or paired with a spread of mango jalapeno and raspberry jam as part of morning, evening or brunch platters, available on the Fratelli website. .

Price Pivot

India’s leading wine brands have launched a range of wines during the pandemic, varied in both treatment and price, Agarwal is optimistic about India’s wine industry, “India’s wine industry has come a long way in a relatively short period of time, which makes for some exceptional wines. While the ₹1,000-1,300 bracket is doing very well, there are premium wines like Rasa that sell closer to ₹1,800 and there is a market for this range as well. Madhulika Bhattacharya Dhall, founder of La Cave, a boutique liquor store with branches across India, agrees: “₹1,500-2,000 is the sweet spot for people buying wines in India, and red wine is preferred to white wine”. While Indian winemakers also cater to Tier 2, 3 and 4 cities, there are wines for new consumers who prefer “fruitier selections like Chenin Blanc, but drier wines are also popular,” concludes Agarwal.

The Indian wine industry is not only looking to increase sales through liquor stores, but also to increase visibility and accessibility. Maharashtra is the first state to allow the sale of wines in large supermarket chains. In Kolkata, one can order wines through food aggregation apps, while Odisha in Jharkhand also offers home delivery of wines. Holkar adds that offering wines in different packaging can make it more accessible. “In Maharashtra, the AIWPA is looking to ask wineries to sell wines in value-priced boxes and growlers under five liters – these are great friendly options for small parties. Allowing wines to be more accessible is great for producers, and it is an agri-food industry, ideal also for those who work in the vineyards.

Fratelli- Plate of cheeses and condiments

Fratelli- Cheese and condiment platter | Photo credit: PRAMEET

Sonal Holland

Sonal Holland

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The rise of wine brands and local wineries in India https://vinivert.com/the-rise-of-wine-brands-and-local-wineries-in-india-2/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/the-rise-of-wine-brands-and-local-wineries-in-india-2/ As young Indians seek accessibility, affordability and sustainability in their wine choices, local brands and wineries are responding, eliminating snobbery with cans, easy-drinking spritzers and Syrah-flushed cheese. As young Indians seek accessibility, affordability and sustainability in their wine choices, local brands and wineries are responding, eliminating snobbery with cans, easy-drinking spritzers and Syrah-flushed cheese. Indian […]]]>

As young Indians seek accessibility, affordability and sustainability in their wine choices, local brands and wineries are responding, eliminating snobbery with cans, easy-drinking spritzers and Syrah-flushed cheese.

As young Indians seek accessibility, affordability and sustainability in their wine choices, local brands and wineries are responding, eliminating snobbery with cans, easy-drinking spritzers and Syrah-flushed cheese.

Indian wines are maturing, and how. Indian viticulture has seen a resurgence during the pandemic as consumers explored wines across categories and price ranges, to drink on their couches during lockdowns, and then, during last year’s home dine-in flurries. .

As brands innovate to attract new consumers, with pandemic restrictions lifted across the country, wine sales have seen a surge, which is good news for an industry that thrives on festive occasions. With a renaissance in rosé, a focus on sustainability and a growing base of enthusiastic consumers, the industry is expected to grow by $274 million by 2026, growing 29.3% year-over-year in 2022, according to a recent report by Technavio, a global group. research and consulting company. “Wine consumption in retail and at home has seen a steady increase over the past two years; currently almost 3/4 of our sales are off-trade, and only 1/4 is on-trade,” says Chaitanya Rathi, COO, Sula Vineyards headquartered in Nashik.

Locked up with wine

At Fratelli Wines, based in Akluj, Maharashtra, in-state home delivery pushed sales during the 2020-21 lockdowns, but, “once the stores opened, we saw people in all walks of life, preferring browse wine selections and are back in department stores,” says Jayanth Bharathi, DGM, Marketing, Fratelli Wines. The All India Wine Producers Association, led by Jagdish Holkar, has benefited from the streamlining of excise taxes and duties in Maharashtra and West Bengal, but the industry wants a separate category for wine in the excise lexicon.

Sparkling Rose Noi

Sparkling Rose Noi

“Wine can be removed from the Indian Made Foreign Liquor (IMFL) category, and giving us a separate fork will be good for business. Currently, the majority of our sales come from Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru and the state of Goa, but breaking down interstate barriers will also be key to making Chennai, Hyderabad, Kolkata and other cities great wine markets.” , adds Holkar.

Sonal Holland, a Master of Wine and founder of the Sonal Holland Wine Academy, which offers online courses in wine appreciation and education, is excited about the outlook for the industry in 2022. India’s wine industry relied on international tourists to drive consumption, but that’s changing. There is also a 200% increase in wine education course enrollment among Indian consumers. Single-serve wines are popular now, easy to pack and enjoy. We are also seeing an increase in demand for rosé, the fastest growing category in the market. Once considered a women’s brunch staple, rosé is now a gender-neutral beverage of choice in its still or sparkling variant,” she says.

Fratelli Wines has spent the past two years, during the pandemic, focusing on wine education within the hospitality industry in Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities. Gaurav Sekhri, MD of Fratelli Wines, says that he too noticed that the rosé was flying off the shelves. “First-time drinkers usually start with white wines, as they are easier on the palate, and reds with their tannins offer a drier mouthfeel. Rosé goes well with the accessibility of a white and the aromatic complexity of a red. Our Shiraz Rose at ₹800 and M/S Rose at ₹1,250 (Maharashtra) were very popular.

Gregoire Vardein-Sula

Gregoire Vardein-Sula

The brand’s Noi Sparkling Rosé (₹980 in Maharashtra) in a blush decorative bottle, launched in early 2022, has been doing good business. The company’s vertical Tilt sold in single-serve cans – in its Red White, Sparkling, Sparkling Rosé and Noi Spritzer variants is popular for all-day drinking – lighter than a bottle and lighter on the pocket too, at from ₹180. “Spritzers with 8% ABV (the amount of alcohol in a drink by volume) are lighter than wines and great on their own or even mixed with gin or vodka,” adds Sekhri.

The art of aging

Grover Zampa, one of the oldest winemakers in the country, with vineyards in Nandi Hills, Karnataka and Nashik, Maharashtra, weathered the pandemic with the launch of his Signet Collection in December 2021, a range of premium aged red wines in traditional European ships, one first for winemakers. Signet is India’s first range of wines to be aged in vats, amphorae (two-handled jars with a neck narrower than the body, used as decanters in ancient Greece) and concrete vats. While the brand uses Italian steel tanks for its wine processing, the Signet range uses different earthy materials traditionally used in Europe, which interact differently with wine, providing unique mouthfeel and tasting notes.

Bringing wines to the table during the pandemic has been an uphill climb, with pandemic restrictions during the harvest season from April to June in 2020 and imports from special aging vessels suspended. “Wine being a living liquid, we had to be careful about the time it spent in the vats and bottles, letting the sommeliers do their part as we faced the logistical challenges,” says Sumit Jaiswal, AVP, Marketing and EXIM , Grover Zampa .

Signet Spectrum is a dry red wine: a blend of Shiraz, Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet, Franc and Muscat grapes, all hand-picked from the brand’s vineyards, fermented and aged for 12 months in concrete vats in egg shape. Signet Shiraz (Amphora), was fermented and aged for 12 months in terracotta amphoras. The porous structure of terracotta clay allows for micro-oxygenation which helps soften tannins, resulting in a deep, rich structure with no added flavors. Other wines under the Signet umbrella are fermented for 12 months in 2,000 liter and 1,000 liter French oak vats (large wooden vats, popular in France’s Rhone Valley, significantly larger than casks typical oak barrels), Signet Shiraz (24-month-old French barrels) is aged in 225-litre French oak barrels for 24 months and 12 months in bottle.

Nikhil Agarwal, Sommelier and Founder, All Things Nice, opines, “Indian wineries offer high-quality premium wines, and the Signet is very impressive, with the kind of treatment it has received at Grover. Zampah.

Rasa by Sula

Rasa by Sula

2021 also saw the launch of Rasa from Sula Vineyards in Nashik. Sula, inspired by founder Rajeev Samant’s mother, Sulabha, was established in 1999. While Rasa has been around since 2007-08, alongside brands Dindori, The Source and its classics, “with Rasa in September 2021, we went with a revamp – from identity to winemaking. We are currently working to make the three grape varieties – Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Zinfandel, available across India,” says Grégoire Verdin – Global Brand Ambassador – AVP Tastings and Marketing, Sula Wines With a significant increase in D2C (direct to consumer) sales, Sula Wines is optimistic about its new consumers, “Many Indians have rediscovered Indian wines due to the shortage of imports, and they have realized that the Indian wines are as good and quite often better than imported ones.

As the wine lifestyle appeals to rising young oenophiles, brands like Fratelli are augmenting the wine experience with Asia’s first selection of wine-inspired cheeses, created in collaboration with artisan cheese brand Käse based in Chennai. The A2 cow’s milk cheese, is wrapped in Sangiovese vine leaves or rinsed in wine-infused brine, then aged. “While we had fabulous reception for our first batch of wine-inspired cheeses, we are excited about the new launches,” says Sekhri. In addition to the gusto rinsed syrah, sunburst rinsed chenin and sangiovese leaf aged cheddar, the recently launched barrel aged feta and smoked provolone are all available separately at ₹465 for 150 grams, or paired with a spread of mango jalapeno and raspberry jam as part of morning, evening or brunch platters, available on the Fratelli website. .

Price Pivot

India’s leading wine brands have launched a range of wines during the pandemic, varied in both treatment and price, Agarwal is optimistic about India’s wine industry, “India’s wine industry has come a long way in a relatively short period of time, which makes for some exceptional wines. While the ₹1,000-1,300 bracket is doing very well, there are premium wines like Rasa that sell closer to ₹1,800 and there is a market for this range as well. Madhulika Bhattacharya Dhall, founder of La Cave, a boutique liquor store with branches across India, agrees: “₹1,500-2,000 is the sweet spot for people buying wines in India, and red wine is preferred to white wine”. While Indian winemakers also cater to Tier 2, 3 and 4 cities, there are wines for new consumers who prefer “fruitier selections like Chenin Blanc, but drier wines are also popular,” concludes Agarwal.

The Indian wine industry is not only looking to increase sales through liquor stores, but also to increase visibility and accessibility. Maharashtra is the first state to allow the sale of wines in large supermarket chains. In Kolkata, one can order wines through food aggregation apps, while Odisha in Jharkhand also offers home delivery of wines. Holkar adds that offering wines in different packaging can make it more accessible. “In Maharashtra, the AIWPA is looking to ask wineries to sell wines in value-priced boxes and growlers under five liters – these are great friendly options for small parties. Allowing wines to be more accessible is great for producers, and it is an agri-food industry, ideal also for those who work in the vineyards.

Fratelli- Plate of cheeses and condiments

Fratelli- Cheese and condiment platter | Photo credit: PRAMEET

Sonal Holland

Sonal Holland

]]>
Clean wine brands: what you need to know about the buzzing trend https://vinivert.com/clean-wine-brands-what-you-need-to-know-about-the-buzzing-trend/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 14:20:38 +0000 https://vinivert.com/clean-wine-brands-what-you-need-to-know-about-the-buzzing-trend/ You’ve probably heard of organic fruits, vegetables and poultry. The definition of the term is difficult to define. However, in general, “organic” foods are grown or raised without using certain chemicals, pesticides or other artificial agents. You may notice the word “organic” on more and more labels these days, and not just on items in […]]]>

You’ve probably heard of organic fruits, vegetables and poultry. The definition of the term is difficult to define. However, in general, “organic” foods are grown or raised without using certain chemicals, pesticides or other artificial agents.

You may notice the word “organic” on more and more labels these days, and not just on items in the produce or meat aisles. Even your favorite wine producers are starting to use it. You may also see terms such as “clean”, “natural”, or “biodynamic”. Do they all mean the same thing? Is organic wine good for you? We’ve cut out the buzzword marketing phrases to find out the truth about the trend.

Torsten Dettlaff/Pexels

What is Clean Wine?

“Clean wine brands” is a term that creates a broad umbrella that covers many equally vague subsets that are often used interchangeably. Let’s review what each means.

  • Own wine: Generally speaking, winemakers say clean wine is made without added sugars or additives like colorants. Winemakers generally produce vino using organic or biodynamic grapes.
  • Organic wine: This wine is made from grapes grown without herbicides, pesticides, banned substances or genetic engineering. Instead, farmers and vineyard staff use cover crops to keep insects and weeds away. Organic is actually a legal definition. The USDA will certify something as organic in the United States, but definitions vary by country.
  • Natural wine: The big difference between organic wine and natural wine is that natural wine is not legally defined. Therefore, the meaning of the term is open to some level of interpretation. Using organic grapes is part of the process. That said, proponents of “natural wine” argue that while organic wines must undergo rigid certification processes, natural wines are less likely to be made using additives, sulfates and agents. lift-off.
  • Biodynamic wine: Unlike organic wine, the definition of biodynamic wine is universal. Vineyard staff base their farming practices on an astronomical calendar that dictates when grapes should be harvested, pruned, watered and left untouched. Biodynamic wines avoid pesticides and use compost rather than chemical fertilizers. They can contain up to 100 parts per million of sulfites, which is more than the USDA allows for certified organic wine.

Why is clean wine trendy?

There are many reasons why clean wine has become popular.

  • It might be healthier. Studies show that eating organic fruit can reduce your risk of cancer. You’re probably safe in saying that drinking wine made from organic grapes rather than standard wine will also reduce cancer risk.
  • It’s more eco-friendly. Instead of killing insects with chemical-laden pesticides, these farmers use cover crops that also serve as their habitats. Farmers can also let sheep graze on weeds near vines instead of using herbicides, creating a natural ecosystem that does not harm the environment or the consumer.
  • Less hangover. Perhaps the biggest supposed benefit: People swear they don’t get hangovers after drinking pure wine.

green grapes hanging from the vine on the vineyard

Do own wine brands really deserve the hype?

Clean wine has its share of supporters. However, is that all it’s supposed to be? Here’s what you need to know before filling your wine cellar.

  • It’s still wine. Organic cookies remain cookies. Organic wine is still alcohol. It is best to drink it in moderation, as excessive alcohol consumption can lead to health problems including high blood pressure, heart disease and liver problems. The CDC defines a glass of wine as five ounces of vino with an alcohol content of 12%. Women aged 21 and over who drink four or more alcoholic beverages on one occasion or who drink eight or more drinks per week engage in heavy drinking. The same is true for men who drink five or more drinks in one sitting or 15 or more drinks per week.
  • The definitions are inconsistent. Depending on the term used (organic vs natural, for example) or the country it comes from, you can still consume additives. Additionally, the FDA regulates additives in all wines to ensure your safety. Therefore, you’re probably not drinking anything toxic in a standard glass of wine, which may be cheaper than anything that says “organic” or “clean” on the label.

Wine brands use different terms on their bottles, including clean, organic, and natural. Sometimes they use these words interchangeably, but often there are key differences. For example, “organic” is legally defined, while natural is not. However, “natural” winemakers say they are even more rigid about nixing additives and fining agents. Often, clean wine brands use environmentally friendly farming methods, such as using cover crops to keep insects away from grapes instead of pesticides. Proponents swear clean wine gives them less of a hangover, and drinking wines made with organically grown grapes can reduce your risk of cancer. That said, all wines are alcoholic beverages. Excessive alcohol consumption is harmful, so raise your glass in moderation.

BlissMark provides health, wellness and beauty information. The information in this article is not intended to be medical advice. Before beginning any diet or exercise routine, consult your doctor. If you don’t have a primary care physician, the US Department of Health and Human Services has a free online tool that can help you locate a clinic in your area. We are not medical professionals, we have not verified or endorsed any program, and in no way do we intend our content to be anything other than informative and inspirational.

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