Wine processing – Vini Vert http://vinivert.com/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 13:42:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://vinivert.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-5-120x120.png Wine processing – Vini Vert http://vinivert.com/ 32 32 Census interference targeted in bill and recommendations https://vinivert.com/census-interference-targeted-in-bill-and-recommendations/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 13:33:38 +0000 https://vinivert.com/census-interference-targeted-in-bill-and-recommendations/ Democratic lawmakers, determined to ensure the Trump administration’s unprecedented efforts to politicize the 2020 census never happen again, are moving forward with backup plans they say will help the U.S. tally to remain free from any future interference. House Democrats are preparing to send legislation to the House floor this week that would put up […]]]>

Democratic lawmakers, determined to ensure the Trump administration’s unprecedented efforts to politicize the 2020 census never happen again, are moving forward with backup plans they say will help the U.S. tally to remain free from any future interference.

House Democrats are preparing to send legislation to the House floor this week that would put up roadblocks against political interference in the U.S. census, which determines political power and federal funding.

House legislation that will be heard this week before the Rules Committee will require that new questions on a census form be considered by Congress and that a director of the U.S. Census Bureau cannot be fired without cause. The proposed legislation makes the director of the Census Bureau responsible for all technical, operational, and statistical decisions and states that an assistant director must be a career staff member with experience in demographics, statistics, or related fields. If approved by the committee, it will be sent to the House floor for a vote later this week.

The goals of the legislation overlap with recommendations made Tuesday by the Brennan Center for Justice that would limit executive branch interference and increase congressional oversight of the census. The think tank, which has opposed the Trump administration’s efforts to end the U.S. count early, recommends making the U.S. Census Bureau more independent.

The once-a-decade census determines the number of congressional seats each state gets and the breakdown of $1.5 trillion in federal spending each year. Its results are used to redraw political constituencies. The 2020 census was one of the toughest in recent memory, not only due to attempted political interference, but also due to the COVID-19 pandemic and natural disasters.

In the years leading up to the 2020 census, the Trump administration tried unsuccessfully to add a question about citizenship to the census questionnaire, a move advocates feared would scare Hispanics and immigrants from participating. whether they are legally in the country or not. The Supreme Court blocked the issue.

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Europe restricts Russian travelers as Russia opposes Tit-for-Tat visa requirements https://vinivert.com/europe-restricts-russian-travelers-as-russia-opposes-tit-for-tat-visa-requirements/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 15:07:42 +0000 https://vinivert.com/europe-restricts-russian-travelers-as-russia-opposes-tit-for-tat-visa-requirements/ Epidemic of oil and gas psychosis in so-called hostile countries continues to escalate as G7 countries (UK, Germany, Italy, Canada, France, Japan and US) plan to introduce cap prices for Russian oil by December 5. This decision will further unbalance global oil and gas flows with unpredictable consequences for all market participants. The G7 members […]]]>

Epidemic of oil and gas psychosis in so-called hostile countries continues to escalate as G7 countries (UK, Germany, Italy, Canada, France, Japan and US) plan to introduce cap prices for Russian oil by December 5.

This decision will further unbalance global oil and gas flows with unpredictable consequences for all market participants. The G7 members finally froze the ideals of the “free market” and “free competition”, as well as those of free access to energy resources, including LNG, and to transformed hydrocarbons. This will certainly affect prices and other important factors that will be very visible in the global energy field.

Do you want to remove Russia, one of the world’s three biggest players, from this market? If so, you will get a serious distortion of the whole system – oil, gas, price, economic. Yes, it will benefit the United States, but pretty much everyone, including the American G7 partners, not to mention everyone else in the global energy market.

The Americans, as always, are leading the way with repressive statements, with Republican Senator Marco Rubio having already drafted a bill sanctioning oil and LNG shipments from Russia to China. However, a halt in oil supplies from Russia will force Beijing to join the fight for hydrocarbons from the Middle East and Africa, which is sure to drive up prices.

The West continues to step up its sanctions pressure on Russia, justifying this with Moscow’s ongoing special military operation in Ukraine.

The events of the past 12 years have changed the energy and political landscape of the world, with the United States going from the world’s largest consumer of oil and gas to its first major producer and exporter, while China has become the main consumer of these Resources. .

During the 1990s and early 2000s, the United States and the International Energy Agency believed that for the foreseeable future, America would remain the world’s largest importer of energy resources. Therefore, Washington was actively seeking external partners in the energy sector, while Russia was considered one of the main such partners, along with Saudi Arabia. Indeed, after the crisis of the 1970s, the United States relied on the Middle East – above all on the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia – as the main guarantor of its own energy security. During the 1990s, Washington’s hopes naturally fell on Russia.

Russia needed technology, investment, and management experience from the United States, and the United States needed Russian energy resources, especially oil and gas, and Russian markets for American products. This cooperation was developing rapidly, and in the 1990s, American companies actively participated in the implementation of large oil and gas investment projects in Russia (Sakhalin-1, Sakhalin-2, etc.), the US government providing strong political support and prioritization of these projects.

The Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission, where I worked, was directly involved in promoting these projects. One of the results of the May 2001 meeting between the presidents of Russia and the United States was the idea of ​​an energy dialogue between the two countries, aimed at promoting commercial cooperation in the energy sector. energy by increasing interaction between Russian and American companies engaged in the exploration, production, processing, transportation and marketing of energy resources, as well as in the implementation of joint projects, including in third country.

Also in 2001, the white paper “US-Russia Partnership: New Times, New Opportunities” was released, which set out the position of the US Congress regarding energy cooperation with Russia. The document explicitly stated that the development of bilateral energy cooperation should become a priority of American foreign policy, since the United States could thus “protect itself from the risks of uncertainty in energy supplies and unnecessary dependence.”** ( American Foreign Policy Council (Washington, DC: Franklin’s Printing Company, 2003.)

However, American technological advancements and new industrial breakthroughs achieved in a single decade have turned the situation upside down. With the advent of the shale revolution, the pace of cooperation between the two countries, including in the field of energy, has slowed down. A shift in America’s priorities has pushed its energy partnership with Russia into the background. Moreover, the dramatic reduction in energy ties with Russia has become an additional factor in Washington’s push for a general escalation of tensions with Moscow. Similar things are happening with our main European partner, Germany. “In addition to the pandemic, sanctions, global trade disputes and protectionism have become a serious challenge for large German companies, medium-sized companies and family businesses operating in Russia,” said Rainer Seele, former company executive. Austrian OMV.

In Europe, dreams of a future low-carbon energy are still alive, even if the upcoming winter season has put them on the back burner. The German government fears that the shortage of gas this winter will cause emergencies in several regions of the country. In France, representatives of the industrial sector are seriously concerned about rising gas prices and warn that in the worst case scenario, this could lead to a complete collapse in production.

By the way, Russia earlier offered its European partners to sign long-term contracts for the supply of natural gas. However, Brussels considered this proposal unprofitable, preferring to buy gas at floating spot prices. As a result, Europe has been forced to reactivate its closed coal-fired power plants – a move that was only recently condemned by the European Union.

If you’re thinking not seasonally, but on a large scale, you should have a clear picture of what global natural gas consumption will look like, at least in the next five years. For example, its main consumer, China, has increased its gas consumption by more than 30 billion cubic meters per year over the past five years and plans to increase by 2030 the share of gas to 15% of l energy, compared to 8% in 2021. This means that the rapid growth of gas demand in China will continue until the end of this decade. The exact source of this gas is another question, which falls under Beijing’s energy policy.

So, does the world need more hydrocarbons or not? Have we “forgotten” coal or are we using it? Is nuclear energy necessary in the future or is it also classified as an unwanted source of energy? All of these issues are under continuous discussion at the highest level in countries that bow down to the United States. Total confusion! And for global energy development, this is absolutely unacceptable and even extremely dangerous! As for the Americans, they are delighted with this whole situation with an increase in their export potential and large LNG shipments to Latin America, Europe and Asia.

Meanwhile, with the issues of the pandemic (as an objective factor) and the issue of global warming being exaggerated, hydrocarbon producers no longer have 5-10 year production guidelines and politicians have all but banned banks to finance hydrocarbon projects and insure the risks of mining companies. Therefore, British Petroleum says it will exit the hydrocarbon energy market within a decade or two. After all, any serious energy project requires billions of dollars of investment with a development perspective of at least twenty-five years.

I am sure that global gas consumption will increase. In the next five or six years, the planet will need an additional 150 billion cubic meters of natural gas. If Russian gas is gradually withdrawn from European markets, by 2027 they will have to find around 300 billion in addition to 2021 volumes.

We must act now, without going back on the contradictory decisions of countries entangled in the energy policy of Washington and Brussels.

The world of energy needs stability and predictability. If the United States is going astray, then someone has to chart the right unifying course. I must say that China, the main consumer of hydrocarbons, has a vital interest in the stability of this world, as do the main players in the Middle East and the OPEC countries. They are the ones who, together with Russia, will have to chart the course for the energy development of our planet.

From our partner International Affairs

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Negative health effects of ultra-processed foods go beyond their nutrient profiles, say researchers https://vinivert.com/negative-health-effects-of-ultra-processed-foods-go-beyond-their-nutrient-profiles-say-researchers/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 11:28:49 +0000 https://vinivert.com/negative-health-effects-of-ultra-processed-foods-go-beyond-their-nutrient-profiles-say-researchers/ The impact of the consumption of ultra-processed foods on human health may be more important than the nutritional qualities of the food. According new search in Italy, food classifications currently used for packaged food labels may miss the point by focusing primarily on the nutrient profile of processed foods. People should stop focusing only on […]]]>

The impact of the consumption of ultra-processed foods on human health may be more important than the nutritional qualities of the food.

According new search in Italy, food classifications currently used for packaged food labels may miss the point by focusing primarily on the nutrient profile of processed foods.

People should stop focusing only on the nutrient profile of foods. They need to start exploring the degree of processing of the foods they buy.– Marialaura Bonaccio, Senior Epidemiologist, Italian Mediterranean Neurological Institute

The research paper published by the Journal of the British Medical Association (BMJ) found that high consumption of ultra-processed foods leads to higher mortality risks from several causes. However, the nutritional profile of these foods does not affect these risks.

The same edition of the BMJ also presented American research demonstrating a link between high consumption of ultra-processed foods and colorectal cancer, with significant differences in impact between men and women.

See also:Health info

Studying the results of their 15-year study on more than 20,000 people, the Italian researchers tested the effects of eating ultra-processed foods, classified as such by the NOVA rankings, while taking into account their nutritional classification. of the Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System ( FSAm-NPS).

NOVA was developed by researchers at the University of São Paulo in Brazil. According to a 2019 article from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the NOVA definitions of ultra-processed foods are the most applied in the scientific literature.

FSAm-NPS, on the other hand, is currently used to rate foods by relevant front-of-package labeling systems, such as the French-originated Nutri-Score.

We felt the need to see if Nutri-Score could really help improve public health, as the European Commission is currently considering its introduction as a mandatory EU-wide food scoring system”, Marialaura Bonaccio, epidemiologist principal at the Italian Mediterranean Neurological Institute and co-author of the study, Olive Oil Times said.

Over the past 10 years, research has gone beyond just the nutrient concentration of foods,” she added. Through the work of Carlos Monteiro and others, research began to focus on how food is processed and handled.

According to the researchers, FSAm-NPS and NOVA achieve their food scoring goals when applied individually to foods. The results change, however, when the two indices are taken into account together.

Both systems correctly predict health risks,” Bonaccio said. If you consistently choose foods deemed unsuitable by the Nutri-Score, you put yourself at increased risk of contracting relevant diseases. The same goes for NOVA, which is also associated with a risk of coronary heart disease.

When considered together, however, the risks associated with Nutri-Score are reduced by the NOVA system, and this tells us that we are not seeing the impact of a nutrient-poor diet, but the impact of ultra-processed foods,” she added. . More than 80% of foods classified Nutri-Score as poor quality foods are ultra-processed.

In the study, the authors wrote that a significant proportion of the higher mortality risk associated with high consumption of nutrient-poor foods was explained by a high degree of food processing. In contrast, the relationship between high consumption of ultra-processed foods and mortality was not explained by the poor quality of these foods.

The NOVA system generally defines ultra-processed foods as foods containing five or more ingredients not typically found in a household. These substances, such as additives and activators, are part of ultra-processing methods because they come from the further processing of food components.

The definition of the ultra-process is crucial because it is not unequivocal. It’s mostly common sense,” Bonaccio said. If I’m making a pie at home, I can use many simple ingredients like flour, eggs, or milk. And the result could depend on the right balance between these ingredients.

But when, in addition, I use food additives, then the pie starts to become an ultra-processed food,” she added. This is why the definition is not completely unequivocal. For example, if in a supermarket you see a fruit-based yogurt whose packaging displays five rows of ingredients, that might be enough to spot an ultra-processed food.

The food industry commonly uses additives to impart specific colors to foods and to sweeten or preserve them. Other additives cover many functions, such as enhancing flavors, suppressing fungus, inhibiting particular characteristics of the food, or sanitizing the food itself.

Food processing may play a role in health beyond its nutritional composition, through a variety of mechanisms triggered by non-nutritional components, such as cosmetic additives, food contact materials, newly formed compounds and degradation of the food matrix,” the researchers wrote. .

The health risks we found in our study are related to high consumption of ultra-processed foods,” Bonaccio added. Therefore, the suggestion here is not to abolish this type of food but to limit its consumption. People should stop focusing only on the nutrient profile of foods. They need to start exploring the degree of processing of the foods they buy. »

See also:Updated Nutri-Score label indicates whether foods are processed, organic

She recommends that a suitable method for limiting ultra-processed foods is to spend more time in the kitchen and follow the advice of journalist and food writer Michael Pollan not to eat foods your grandmother wouldn’t recognize. like food.

Your grandmother wouldn’t know what substances like maltodextrin are. That means cooking should stay close to where the food comes from and as far away from food handling as possible,” Bonaccio said, citing a widely used ultra-processed carbohydrate.

In a joint editorial on the two studies published by the BMJ, Carlos A. Monteiro, professor of public health nutrition at the University of São Paulo and Geoffrey Cannon, lead researcher, warned that Reformulating ultra-processed foods through methods such as replacing sugar with artificial sweeteners or fat with modified starches and adding extrinsic fiber, vitamins and minerals is not a solution.

Reformulated ultra-processed foods would be particularly troublesome if promoted as First’ or healthy products,” they added. They would remain partly, mainly or only formulations of chemicals.

Following their study, the Italian researchers cautioned against adopting any food labeling system primarily based on the nutritional aspects of foods.

In Nutri-Score, for example, you can find highly refined and processed foods that score well and appear healthy,” Bonaccio said. This happens because they may be low in salt, sugar, or fat. But that doesn’t mean they should be considered healthy food.

An example of this is artificially sweetened sugar-free sodas, which get healthy scores, even when they are not food at all, but just a chemical formulation,” Bonaccio added.

She noted that the consumption of ultra-processed foods is increasing globally. In the United States and the United Kingdom, the most recent data show that 60% of daily calories, on average, come from this type of food. We’re still at 20% in Italy, but that’s also the trend here.

While the latest US and Italian studies join the growing literature on the health effects of consuming ultra-processed foods, it remains unclear what the reasons for these negative health consequences are.

We have to investigate the internal mechanism,” Bonaccio said. Now able to put aside the nutritional aspects of a poor quality diet, we still need to understand what triggers these adverse reactions.

Researchers from many countries are working on several hypotheses, studying the impact of alterations in the food matrix or the destruction of phytochemicals and other substances.

Other research focuses on the impact of food separation and reaggregation on the microbiome and insulin response or plastic exposure from the packaging of most products.

Each of these conditions could be a trigger for pathophysiological processes,” Bonaccio said. We are currently working on the inflammatory pathway, as these aspects could play a role in increasing levels of inflammation.

The Mediterranean diet lights the way,” she concluded. The MedDiet is not only fruits, vegetables, a light contribution of wine and olive oil; it is primarily an unprocessed diet. We must always remember that it comes from the tradition of farmers made with raw foods or lightly processed foods and the use of minimal techniques.



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Stormalong Cider – Cidrerie – BevNET.com Beverage Industry Job Listing https://vinivert.com/stormalong-cider-cidrerie-bevnet-com-beverage-industry-job-listing/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 19:03:30 +0000 https://vinivert.com/stormalong-cider-cidrerie-bevnet-com-beverage-industry-job-listing/ Stormalong Cider is an award-winning craft cider producer looking for a dedicated cider maker to join our production team in Leominster, MA. Founded in 2014, Stormalong Cider is committed to quality, making delicious ciders with the highest quality whole ingredients we can find. Our motto is “Respect the Apple”, which we take to heart by […]]]>

Stormalong Cider is an award-winning craft cider producer looking for a dedicated cider maker to join our production team in Leominster, MA. Founded in 2014, Stormalong Cider is committed to quality, making delicious ciders with the highest quality whole ingredients we can find. Our motto is “Respect the Apple”, which we take to heart by growing and purchasing unique Heirloom cider apples used to make cutting-edge cider. The ideal candidate will be detail-oriented, flexible, reliable and will be happy to expand their skills in all aspects of cider making. Experience in cider making, winemaking, brewing and/or beverage production is preferred.

Responsibilities:

  • Responsible for the day-to-day execution of all cider-making related tasks including raw material management, apple and fruit processing, fermentation, aging, cold processing, blending and packaging .

  • Maintain pumps, pipes and all other materials/equipment.

  • Maintain a sanitary environment, which includes, but is not limited to, cleaning floors, walls, tanks, machinery and sinks.

  • Execution of the mixture and execution of the recipe.

  • Work in tandem with the COO and R&D CEO in creating new recipes and styles.

  • Inventory management of all vats and cider in process.

  • Inventory management of fermentation equipment and packaging products, with communication of replenishment needs to the operations manager and establishment of replenishment levels.

  • Reception, storage and organization of unfinished products on site in coordination with the operations manager.

  • Loading and unloading trucks for incoming and outgoing orders.

  • Ongoing, consistent and accurate data entry and management of EKOS Cider Making production software (training provided).

  • Execution of fermentation protocols.

  • Other duties assigned/necessary.

  • Optional participation in events as a representative of Stormalong Cider.

Experience & Skills:

  • Strong work ethic.

  • Disciplined, with an emphasis on detail, safety and accurate record keeping.

  • Able to multi-task and adapt to changing priorities.

  • Able to work both independently and within a team.

  • Responsive to direction and constructive feedback.

  • Ability to troubleshoot equipment and communicate issues to management.

Requirements and working conditions:

  • 1+ years of hands-on experience in cider making or beverage production

  • A thorough knowledge of cider apples is a plus!

  • Able to lift over 55 pounds multiple times during a shift

  • Able to work in hot, cold and humid environments

  • Able to stand on concrete floors for the duration of the shift (8 hours)

  • Able to use a pallet truck to move drums and other heavy loads

  • Occasional use of a forklift is required (training provided if needed)

  • Flexibility in schedules as needed

  • Must hold a valid driver’s license and be able to operate a motor vehicle safely

  • Must be at least 21 years old

Advantages and Benefits:

About Stormalong Cider

Stormalong Cider, founded in 2014, is a Massachusetts-based craft cider house that produces a wide range of ciders focused on apple quality and character. Using a mix of culinary and rare varieties, Stormalong ferments and ages its ciders with traditional and modern techniques that bring out the unique characteristics of these diverse apples. Fascinated and inspired by the robust lineage of American hard cider, Stormalong aims to showcase the diversity, flavor and quality of cider made with the right apples. For more information, visit www.stormalong.com or follow Stormalong on Instagram @stormalongcider.

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Nevada Field Day offers hands-on activities and demonstrations https://vinivert.com/nevada-field-day-offers-hands-on-activities-and-demonstrations/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 20:16:39 +0000 https://vinivert.com/nevada-field-day-offers-hands-on-activities-and-demonstrations/ On Nevada Field Day on September 17, visitors will be treated to a variety of hands-on activities, wine tastings, demonstrations and giveaways, including a farm-to-fork cooking demonstration and samples at noon on the main stage at the University of Nevada. , Elisabeth Watkins of Reno. Watkins is known to many as Linden’s Farm Girl Chef, […]]]>

On Nevada Field Day on September 17, visitors will be treated to a variety of hands-on activities, wine tastings, demonstrations and giveaways, including a farm-to-fork cooking demonstration and samples at noon on the main stage at the University of Nevada. , Elisabeth Watkins of Reno. Watkins is known to many as Linden’s Farm Girl Chef, and is a Food Network’s Chopped Junior winner and a TEDx presenter. She earned her undergraduate degree and is working on her graduate degree at the University’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources, which hosts the event, with her Experimental station and Extension units. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the University Main Station Field Laboratory5895 Clean Water Way in Reno, near the intersection of McCarran Boulevard and Mill Street.

Watkins says she learned her cooking skills through Extension’s 4-H youth development programs, and will use produce and meat from the experimental station Desert Agriculture Initiative and Wolf Pack Meats. The Initiative, which will also sell its organic products at the event, runs a commercial farm, including orchards, open fields, greenhouses and a greenhouse, and seeks to advance climate-smart agriculture and sovereignty. food through demonstration, education, research and awareness. Wolf Pack Meats, which will offer tours at 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., provides USDA-inspected harvesting and processing services to local farmers, teaches students the latest meat technology, and maintains its own herd to study ways to produce more meat with better quality.

Other demonstrations on the main stage at Nevada Field Day will involve protecting your home from embers, container gardening and propagating native food and medicinal plants. Additionally, the College’s award-winning student logging sports club, the Nevada Loggers, will host logging-related sporting events, including logging, bucking, and chainsaw demonstrations. There will also be tours of the sheep facilities (10:45 a.m. and 12:45 p.m.) and cattle facilities (11 a.m. and 1 p.m.).

The event will be buzzing with activity at more than 40 booths focusing on the latest advancements in agriculture, horticulture, nutrition, natural resources and the environment. The College’s new Rafter 7 Merino sheep wool clothing line will be on display and for sale. Sheep are world famous for their fine and soft wool.

At the Tasting Table, a partnership formed last fall between the College, its Experimental Station, and Nevada Winemakers and Vintners will offer samples to those 21 and older. The partnership aims to support activities and events, such as classes, wine reviews, winery tours, panel discussions, professional speakers and more, to promote the viticulture and winemaking industries in Nevada .

The tasting table will feature the University’s Riesling wine and red blended wine. Riesling grapes come from Lenox Vineyards in Silver Springs. The award-winning Nevada Sunset Winery harvested the grapes and oversaw the winemaking activities. The red blend is made from four Nevada Sunset Winery varietals, and the precise blend is the result of a College-sponsored wine blending competition in February.

There will also be activities and information for children. The 4-H Youth Development Program will invite youth to participate in papermaking, as an example of how 4-H projects inspire youth to learn about science, health, citizenship and more. The Rethink Your Drink Nevada Program will be there with healthy drink recipes for kids and information on reducing sugary drink consumption in children.

Other kiosks will offer activities and information for adults and young people. Some will make tortillas from different varieties of corn to teach plant breeding, sample products and ask tasters to give feedback on sweetness for a research project, distribute fall seedlings and seed packets, offer gardening advice, will sell plants from plant research, and provide information on a variety of research projects conducted by the College, such as research into:

  • weather and climate (Find out how you can help scientists learn more about Nevada.)
  • plant breeding and genetics
  • low water use alternative crops for nevada
  • use precision irrigation management methods and equipment to improve water conservation
  • characteristics of plants to adapt to drought, salinity and heat
  • increase plant tolerance to harsh environments and increase biomass productivity
  • strategies to improve the efficiency of water use in factories
  • prickly pear production and uses
  • growing hemp in nevada
  • animal breeding, genetics, nutrition and meat science (Kids, come get a cow puzzle.)
  • use modern equipment to assess forage
  • conserve and restore Grand Bassin rangelands and improve sustainable agricultural practices
  • use virtual fences and collars and GPS tracking ear tags to manage cattle grazing
  • methods to address the challenges of wildfire management in the Great Basin
  • the relationship between diet and chronic kidney disease
  • how bacteria and other microbes in the digestive tract affect the health of Nevada residents (Get information about participating in the study.)
  • better understand insect hormones and smell to discover new, safer insecticides and management practices. (See live insect exhibits.)
  • mosquitoes and ticks, and how to reduce their impact as carriers of diseases such as Lyme disease (see how to remove a tick.)
  • economic factors throughout the state, including the economic value of hunting and the Nevada State Park System

Nevada Field Day has been a College tradition for decades, and for more than 65 years, faculty have used the 800-acre Main Station Field Laboratory to provide hands-on educational experiences for students and to conduct research. It has hosted hundreds of programs, such as those focused on raising healthy cattle, controlling noxious weeds, developing crops that use less water, and preserving air and climate quality. ‘water.

“September is a great time of year to visit the University’s Main Station Field Laboratory,” said Bill Payne, Dean of the College. “There will be lots to see and do, and it really helps people understand how we combine the University’s missions of teaching, research, and engagement with our communities to serve Nevadans in their lives. daily.”

Faculty and staff will also be on hand to provide information on the College’s undergraduate and graduate programs, as well as programs offered by In-depth studies – non-credit professional development programs and industry-specific training programs.

Other organizations the College often partners with will also be on hand to provide information, including Nevada’s Western Regional Agricultural Stress Assistance Program; Great Basin Rangelands Research Unit, USDA – Agricultural Research Service; Nevada Section Society for Range Management; and Bees4Vets, a non-profit organization that supports veterans and first responders with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) by teaching beekeeping. The program uses space in the University’s main station field laboratory to conduct programs.

Finally, the food truck Codfather Burgers & Hamburgers will be present. Admission is free, thanks to support from the Truckee Meadows Water Authority and Western Nevada Supply. For more information, call 775-784-6237. Individuals requiring reasonable accommodations should contact Paul Lessick, Civil Rights and Compliance Coordinator, at least five days prior to the event.

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No Liquid, All the Flavor: The Real Business Behind Sherry Barrel Aging https://vinivert.com/no-liquid-all-the-flavor-the-real-business-behind-sherry-barrel-aging/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 13:37:21 +0000 https://vinivert.com/no-liquid-all-the-flavor-the-real-business-behind-sherry-barrel-aging/ It’s like an alcoholic version of the chicken-or-egg problem: sherry cask whiskeys are very popular, but, in general, sherry itself is not. If people don’t really drink sherry, where do the sherry casks come from? Like sherry, sherry casks are supposed to come from a specific place: the sherry triangle in southwestern Spain, located between […]]]>

It’s like an alcoholic version of the chicken-or-egg problem: sherry cask whiskeys are very popular, but, in general, sherry itself is not. If people don’t really drink sherry, where do the sherry casks come from?

Like sherry, sherry casks are supposed to come from a specific place: the sherry triangle in southwestern Spain, located between the towns of Jerez de la Frontera, Sanlúcar de Barrameda and El Puerto de Santa María. in the province of Cadiz. For centuries, this region has produced legendary sweet and dry wines – all widely known as sherry – using the solera process, which fractionally blends new vintages with older vintages, aging them in a series of wooden barrels. Originally, a sherry cask was just that: a wooden cask that had been used to make sherry – or, more commonly, to ship it overseas. But in 1986 Spanish law changed and the export of sherry in wooden casks was banned, rendering the previous concept of a sherry cask obsolete.

An inexpensive resource

Until this change, a large number of sherry casks were destined for the United Kingdom, which was once the largest consumer of the drink in the world. Both thrifty and clever, people there quickly found a use for those empty barrels, like Henry H. Work, the author of “Wood, whiskey and wine: a story of barrels“, Explain.

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“They used to ship barrels of sherry to places like London and then bottle the sherry and sell it,” he says. The remaining barrels were an attractive and inexpensive resource. “They were opportunistic. They were cheap. They didn’t need to buy new barrels. But once that law came into effect in the 1980s, things changed.” be shipped, so Scotch whiskey distilleries no longer had the resource of used sherry casks,” says Work.

But at that time, it wasn’t just economy or ingenuity that drove the use of old sherry casks. Great fino, oloroso, palo cortado, Pedro Ximénez and amontillado sherries can be wonderfully complex, with rich notes of dried fruit, nuts, leather and other alluring characteristics. Some of this complexity of flavors and aromas was appreciated by Scottish distillers and their customers, says Work.

“If they thought there was a benefit to using sherry casks, meaning a specific taste that their customers liked, they would want to continue doing that,” he says.

Initially, any lack of sherry character could be corrected with a dose of paxarette, a Spanish dessert wine commonly used to recondition – here meaning to restore flavor to – old worn out sherry casks. However, in 1990 the legal regulations governing Scotch whisky, known as the Scotch Whiskey Order, were changed. Therefore, paxarette is considered a flavoring agent and its use in the production of Scotch whiskey is prohibited.

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These two legal decisions have led to the growth of an important new business in the Sherry Triangle: the sherry cask trade, which produces sherry-flavored casks for export. Today, Work notes, there are actually two types of sherry casks made in the sherry triangle.

“You get into the solera process, and it stays in that solera for years and years and years. It gets patina around the outside, from the vibe of mold and fungus growing in the area, and it gets the sherry blossom on the inside,” he says. “And there’s another type of barrel that coopers make, and basically these coopers make an export-style barrel.”

An important new product

These exported, sherry-flavored casks were primarily intended for the Scotch whiskey industry, although their popularity has since spread to many other beverages. Due to Spanish law, they cannot be used to export sherry. They also aren’t typically used to make sherry itself – at least not the kind people drink. Instead, they are filled with an inexpensive and relatively young sherry, specially made to season casks destined for export. Markus Eder, dealer of new and used casks, including sherry casks at Guillaume Eder in Germany notes that this sherry can be used to make up to half a dozen sherry casks.

“After repeating this seasoning process about five or six times, you can no longer use this sherry. So you make vinegar out of it, or you throw it away,” he says. “I know of bodegas in Spain that make a million liters of sherry just to season the casks. Basically, the sherry industry only works for the Scotch whiskey industry.

This may sound like a stretch, but the scale of the sherry cask trade today is truly astounding. Due to the current whiskey boom, its importance is increasing, unlike the collapse of the sherry wine industry. Total annual sherry sales are only about a fifth of what they were at their peak three or four decades ago, dropping from around 150 million liters a year to around 30 million liters in recent years, as sherry educator Ruben Luyten reported to sherrynotes.com. (By contrast, the export market for Scotch whiskey alone was around 1 billion liters in 2021.) Recent articles might have argued that sherry is see the growth in some markets, citing an increase in exports of quality dry sherry, but Luyten points out that any improvement in dry sherry sales is offset by continued losses in sweet versions. Overall, the sherry wine industry is now much smaller than it once was.

“I don’t think the revenue and associated profits are disclosed, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the sherry cask industry overtook the wine industry,” Luyten says.

Some calculations at the bottom of the envelope show that this may have already happened, at least in terms of the number of barrels. Some 84,100 casks of sherry were exported last year, says Luyten, as he calculates the volume of all sherry wine sold last year as totaling only around 63,600 casks.

This means that the sherry-flavored cask industry has acquired an important role in the sherry triangle, keeping coopers, vineyards and winemakers in business, even if it is not primarily the business of making the sherry that people drink. In 2015, the Consejo Regulador regulatory board that controls “Jerez-Xérès-Sherry” DOP also began regulating the term “sherry cask”, offering certification of authenticity and several regulatory standardsPrimarily, that sherry casks must be filled with sherry from DOP Jerez-Xérès-Sherry, and that each cask must initially be filled to at least 85 percent of its volume and remain at least two-thirds full for at least less than a year.

César Saldaña, president of the Consejo Regulador, however, claims that the average age of a sherry cask is slightly above the bare minimum.

“Actually, the average seasoning at this point is 18 months,” he says. “For some of the operators here in Jerez it has become a very important activity.”

He notes that the Consejo Regulador plans to expand the cask regulations it launched in 2015. The next step will be to create a register of distillers who buy certified sherry casks.

“Until we regulated the term ‘sherry cask’, there were a lot of distillers who bought their casks from different parts of Spain, casks that were seasoned with different types of wine,” he says. “Now, with this second step, we’re going to make sure producers who use the term ‘sherry cask’ on their labels are actually using a real sherry cask.”

Advantages and disadvantages

Although today’s sherry casks differ from both production casks and casks used for export before 1986, they are not necessarily a step down. This month, Edinburgh brewery Innis & Gunn launched the Original:PX, a special sherried cask version of its classic barrel-aged ale, finished in a blend of first-fill Pedro Ximénez hogsheads, or 250 liter drums, and second fill Pedro Ximénez butts, or 500 liter drums. Dougal Gunn Sharp, founder and brewmaster of the brewery, notes that modern sherry finishing casks can offer advantages over production casks or older shipping casks.

Sherry casks used for sherry cask whiskeys.

“In some ways it improves the quality and processing of the finished product,” he says. “The consistency of the barrels has improved considerably. It’s also more durable. For its sherry-finish beer, Sharp hoped to achieve some of the characteristics of Pedro Ximénez dessert wine: fruity and spicy aromas, a sweeter flavor profile, and hints of chocolate and banana. It all happened, he says.

“It’s absolutely delicious, one of the tastiest limited edition beers we’ve ever brewed,” he says. While sherry-finished beer remains a relative rarity, the use of sherry casks in Scotch whiskey shows few signs of slowing down: Luyten notes that three times as many sherry casks have been sold than just five year. Cost advantages mean they are now typically made from imported American oak, which can cost half the price of French or Hungarian oak, according to Work.

As remnants of the ancient wine and spirits trade, sherry casks can be difficult to understand, even for those working in the beverage industry. Eder says the most common misunderstanding he encounters is a customer who thinks they can easily buy a cask that has been used to produce sherry for many decades, instead of a new American oak cask that has been seasoned with sherry for only 12 months. Older, well-used production barrels still exist, he says, though they’re usually only about seven years old these days. They’re not easy to find, he says, and they certainly aren’t cheap.

“If you’re trying to find a really old keg, you have to spend money,” he says.

The idea that Scottish producers are not allowed to flavor their whiskies, he says, is difficult to reconcile with the fact that most sherry casks are produced specifically for the Scotch whiskey industry, after which the sherry could be discarded or turned into vinegar. If the sherry used to flavor the sherry casks isn’t actually a drink, then what is?

“More or less, it’s just a flavor,” he says. “My opinion is that it would be more honest to allow an additive like paxarette.”

This story is part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the beverage industry, covering wine, beer and spirits – and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!

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Webb snapped near-perfect Einstein’s ring 12 billion light-years away: ScienceAlert https://vinivert.com/webb-snapped-near-perfect-einsteins-ring-12-billion-light-years-away-sciencealert/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 01:00:54 +0000 https://vinivert.com/webb-snapped-near-perfect-einsteins-ring-12-billion-light-years-away-sciencealert/ Since the release of the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope in July, our feeds have been flooded with stunning photos from space – from incredibly detailed images from Jupiter to the most distant known star. Now Webb has done it again, this time capturing a nearly perfect Einstein ring of about 12 […]]]>

Since the release of the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope in July, our feeds have been flooded with stunning photos from space – from incredibly detailed images from Jupiter to the most distant known star.

Now Webb has done it again, this time capturing a nearly perfect Einstein ring of about 12 billion light years away. And we can’t stop watching.

You can see the colorized image, which was shared by a grad student in astronomy Spaceguy44 on Redditbelow.

Like Spaceguy44 explains on Redditan Einstein ring occurs when a distant galaxy has been enlarged and enveloped in a near perfect ring by a massive galaxy in front of it.

The galaxy in question is called SPT-S J041839-4751.8 and it’s a huge 12 billion light years away.

Here is a more distant view, also covered by Spaceguy44:

Galaxy SPT-S J041839-4751.8. (JWST/MAST; Spaceguy44/Reddit)

According to Spaceguy44, we couldn’t see this galaxy at all without Einstein’s ring.

And the presence of Einstein’s rings, in addition to being beautiful, allows us to study these otherwise nearly impossible-to-see galaxies.

This process is known as gravitational lensing, and it’s an effect predicted by Einstein – hence the name.

The effect only occurs when the distant galaxy, the nearest magnifying galaxy, and the observer (in this case, the Webb Space Telescope) align.

If you want to try it for yourself, Spaceguy44 said that the stem and base of a wine glass create a similar effect. Try doing this with a page from a book and see the word zoomed in.

Although it is rare to see Einstein rings, it is not unheard of. Hubble has previously captured images of spectacular Einstein rings.

This isn’t even the first time Webb has captured Einstein’s ring from SPT-S J041839-4751.8.

The Space Telescope’s Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) captured the same region in August, and Spaceguy44 colorized it and then posted it too.

But the image, below, was not so clear.

Yellow ring in space.
Near infrared image of Einstein’s ring. (JWST/MAST; Spaceguy44/Reddit)

In the last image, the data was captured by Webb’s Mid-Infrared Instrument Camera (MIRI), and downloaded from MAST Portal.

The image uses three different filters. Red is the F1000W filter, which captures wavelengths of light at 10 µm. Green is the F770W filter, for 7.7 µm wavelengths. Blue is the F560W filter which captures 5.6 µm wavelengths.

The images were then aligned and colorized by Spaceguy44 using astropiaand further processing was done in GIMP.

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Startup created thanks to a study on aronia berries https://vinivert.com/startup-created-thanks-to-a-study-on-aronia-berries/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 07:30:58 +0000 https://vinivert.com/startup-created-thanks-to-a-study-on-aronia-berries/ When the American Aronia Berry Association approached Husker researcher Changmou Xu with a problem, he set out to solve it in a big way. He and his wife, Xiaoqing Xie, have worked with many campus entities to increase the value of Aronia Berry through their startup, A+ Berry. The company focuses on juice products made […]]]>

When the American Aronia Berry Association approached Husker researcher Changmou Xu with a problem, he set out to solve it in a big way. He and his wife, Xiaoqing Xie, have worked with many campus entities to increase the value of Aronia Berry through their startup, A+ Berry.

The company focuses on juice products made from aronia berries. Due to their astringency, berries have no inherent demand. However, they have great potential to affect the Midwest and beyond with their high yield value as a crop and impressive health benefits.

They feature significantly higher levels of antioxidants than many other popular berries and are expected to yield a much higher yield per acre than other common Midwestern crops.

Through their research, Xie, Xu and their colleagues, including doctoral student Rui Huang, were able to identify the compounds that contributed to the off-putting taste of the berry.

With the help of many on-campus partners, including the Food Processing Center, NUtech Ventures, and student advertising agency Jacht, Xie and Xu decided to turn their research into a business to further solve the problems of the food industry. aronia berries. They also hope to have a positive impact on Nebraska’s economy.

“I want to show how academic research can add additional benefits to industry,” Xu said. “We can go beyond just publishing and change the industry. It is very important that we as researchers think about how we can bring real added value to stakeholders and consumers. »

The secrets of aronia berries

Xie and Xu were able to identify processes that would lessen the astringency of the berry while retaining its health benefits. They filed the patent with NUtech Ventures, which they use to create products offered by A+ Berry.

A+Berry was founded with a mission to create new, great-tasting beverages with the underutilized “super berry” and machine learning to improve human health. This, in turn, would create demand for aronia berries, which grow exceptionally well in the Midwest and could have a big impact on local agriculture. The Company’s products include AroJuice, AroWine and AroConcentrate.

“AroJuice contains three times the antioxidants, more dietary fiber and only one-third the amount of sugar that is on the regular average,” Xu said.

Xie and Xu enjoyed the adventure of learning how to go from researchers to business partners. They received support and mentorship from across the university and the Midwest, including:

  • The Food Science Department and Food Processing Center, which houses research and start-up. A+ Berry received a $125,000 University Research and Development grant from the Nebraska Department of Economic Development to work with the Food Processing Center, which provides a variety of services to food businesses, such as product development, sensory evaluation, labelling, food safety testing and validation. , and pilot-scale production.
  • NUtech Ventures, which prepares patent applications and trains entrepreneurs, including through the Customer Discovery Program.
  • Office of the Nebraska Innovation Campus, which helps make introductions and conducts customer and partner research. A+ Berry is a partner of NIC.
  • The Combine and Invest Nebraska, which provides business development suggestions and presentation assistance.
  • Jacht Agency, which participated in the design of the logo, the label and the brochure.
  • Nebraska Department of Economic Development, which provided grant support, including a $125,000 University Research and Development Grant (Phase I) and a $5,000 SBIR-STTR Grant (Phase 0).
  • NMotion and Gener8tor: A+ Berry was one of five startups selected by the NMotion pre-accelerator program in 2022. NMotion and its parent company, Gene8tor, provided guidance and resources to grow the business.
  • Nebraska Business Development Center, which helped implement the SBIR program.
  • American Aronia Berry Association, which supported research work and raw materials. A+ Berry is a partner of the AABA.
  • Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, University of Chicago Booth School of Business, which provided several mentors.
  • As a faculty member, Xu has received three grants from the USDA Specialty Crops Program on aronia berry research.

To have an impact

Using these resources, Xie and Xu pledge to make an impact on the Midwest and the country. Midwestern agricultural producers who grow aronia berries want to try a high-value crop that can diversify their operations and increase their income from major crops, such as corn and soybeans.

Aronia berries are estimated to yield four times the yield of major crops – around $1,000 per acre. The berry grows well in the Midwest and offers growers low input costs overall. It can also fetch a higher price (70 cents to $1 a pound wholesale), and 1 acre can produce around 4,000 to 8,000 pounds, Xu says.

Xie and Xu see nationwide impacts through the health and environmental benefits of the berry. By developing products that have this impact, they also increase demand, which will help Midwestern agriculture.

The duo have already sourced over 10,000 pounds of berries through their current AroJuice process, which includes purchasing Aronia berries from Midwestern growers, cold pressing to obtain the juice, enhancing the flavor with patent pending technology, bottling and high pressure processing to inactivate microbes and extend shelf life. They hope to continue supporting the development of the industry by reaching millions of pounds of sourced berries in the near future.

To support this goal, they are developing an alcohol-free wine product called AroWine to mimic the flavor of red wine, based on a database of flavor fingerprints and machine learning algorithms. Their research indicated a societal trend toward non-alcoholic wine and beer, which would align with their company’s health and wellness values.

Next steps

Their next steps are to conduct clinical studies to prove the health benefits of the products developed, particularly on cardiovascular health. They are working on AroConcentrate, a freezing concentrate from AroJuice or AroWine, which reduces their packaging and shipping costs by 75% and has little effect on flavor and nutrition.

They are also looking for other ways to innovate and continue their commitment to a zero waste process, which includes transferring pomace from the juicing process into functional ingredients that can be used for the food, cosmetic or nutraceutical industries.

Xie and Xu are passionate about the aronia berry and have a positive impact on several entities. “We would like to see the aronia berry do for the Midwest what grapes did for California,” they said. Learn more about aplusberry.com.

Hartman writes for University Communications and Marketing.

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20 best things to do in Greece https://vinivert.com/20-best-things-to-do-in-greece/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 15:58:35 +0000 https://vinivert.com/20-best-things-to-do-in-greece/ A Greek philosopher once said, “The only true wisdom is knowing that you know nothing” – except when you know you want to visit Greece. Located in the Balkan region and surrounded by a trifecta of seas (Ionian, Aegean and Mediterranean), Greece has no shortage of things to do. Get your dose of history with […]]]>

A Greek philosopher once said, “The only true wisdom is knowing that you know nothing” – except when you know you want to visit Greece.

Located in the Balkan region and surrounded by a trifecta of seas (Ionian, Aegean and Mediterranean), Greece has no shortage of things to do. Get your dose of history with ancient ruins and temples; feast on local ingredients, like tomatoes and olive oil; lay on the beach and do nothing but relax. Land or sea, there is something for everyone.

Whether you’re here for inspiration or to flesh out your travel itinerary, here are the top must-do activities to try while exploring this magical land.

Step back in time by visiting the Acropolis (Athens)

The ancient Erectheion temple at sunset on the Acropolis hillMilos Bicanski/Getty Images

Starting the list with perhaps the most classic recommendation, the acropolis is a must. The ancient citadel is where you can take in sweeping views of Athens while admiring notable monuments such as the Parthenon, Erechtheion, Propylaea, and Temple of Athena. Go through the Acropolis Museum to learn more about its history, too.

Take an Authentic Cooking Class (Athens)

Vladimir Godnik/Getty Images

Although you can take a cooking class anywhere in Greece, Athens offers a diverse range of cuisines. CookinAthens and Greek cuisine teach classic dishes like spanakopita and moussaka, and Ergon House is a good option for adventurous eaters – consider puffing some peinirli pastry with chicken, Gruyere and truffle.

Sip famous white wines (Santorini)

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Santorini is known for its iconic white wines produced from the island’s native white grape, Assyrtikoas well as Greece athiri and aideni varieties. With vineyards scattered across Santorini – from Santo Wine Estate at Vineyard Venetsanos and Gavalas wine estate – there are plenty of tastings for visitors to take part in (many with waterfront views, of course).

Taste tomatoes at the Tomato Industrial Museum (Santorini)

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Make your way to the Tomato Industrial Museum to Santorini to understand how the island’s small-fruited tomatoes get their unique sweet flavor. Wander at your leisure through the old factory converted into a museum and learn about the traditional methods of growing, processing and producing tomatoes. Then, enjoy the succulent fruits during a cooking class or lunch at coffee.

Find a good place to watch the red sunset (Santorini)

Dimitris Meletis/Getty Images

Sunset is arguably the most wonderful time of the day on the island of Santorini. Tourists and locals alike flock to a rooftop, seaside restaurant, or as close to the water’s edge as possible to watch the sun turn bright red and disappear behind the horizon. An alternative and fun way to admire the sunset: on a sunset catamaran cruise.

Go shopping in Little Venice (Mykonos)

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There are plenty of reasons to venture to Mykonos Town, from windmills to open-air restaurants and vibrant nightlife, but an undeniable (and almost unavoidable) must-do is shopping in Little Venice. . As its name suggests, the cobblestone shopping district resembles the Italian city, the home of explorer Marco Polo and a major trading hub along the Silk Road to Asia, according to UNESCO. Today, Little Venice is a one-stop-shop for all your evil eye bracelets, honey in a jar and white dress needs.

Dip your toes in crystal blue water (Mykonos)

Paolo Polidori/EyeEm/Getty Images

There are several beaches in Mykonos where you can enjoy the blue waters of the Aegean Sea. If you are staying in the Old Port area, check out the small strip of beach called Choras Mikonou or take a leisurely stroll to the nearby Megali Ammos. Other notable beaches around the island include Psarou, Kalafatis, Paradise, Super Paradise, Agios Stefanos and Ornos.

Visit the birthplace of Apollo (Delos)

Alena Kravchenko/EyeEm/Getty Images

A 30-minute ferry ride (more or less the winds that day) from Mykonos will take you to the island of Delos, a UNESCO World Heritage Site where Apollo was born, according to mythology. Beyond this extremely cool detail, you can explore the ancient ruins of a trading and religious center from the first millennium BC.

Climb the Mountain of the Gods (Mount Olympus)

Sergei Starus/Getty Images

Cue “I can go the distance.” Mount Olympus is the highest point in Greece and is epic, literally – it’s known in mythology as the home of the gods. However, this climb is far from easy and often takes two days to reach the summit, but you can always take a half-day hike or visit the tourist village of Litochoro at the base.

See the birthplace of the Olympic Games (Olympia)

Adel Bekefi / Getty Images

While the first modern Olympics were held in Athens in 1896, the ancient games called Olympia home. Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Archaeological Site of Olympia dates back to the 10th century BCand with that comes ruins galore – from the Temple of Zeus to ancient sports training areas.

Explore the story mentioned in “The Iliad” and “The Odyssey” (Mycenae)

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If you’re looking to delve into the history of the Trojan War and Homer’s tales, visit the ruins of the city of Mycenae, where mythology says King Agamemnon ruled. Stroll through the Lion’s Gate, the main entrance lined with lion statues, and marvel at architectural structures dating back to the second millennium BC.

Swim along a lunar beach (Milos)

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Sarakiniko Beach on the island of Milos is nicknamed Moon Beach, and it’s easy to see why: its chalky white crater surface and curvy formation give it a lunar vibe.

Learn more about olive oil production (Crete)

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Crete, the largest island in Greece, is home to several olive oil mills and farms worth visiting. Paraschakis Family Olive Oil and Cretan company of the Lyrakis family offering tours of olive oil factories and products, and Cretan olive oil farm provides practice olive oil making experienceas well as additional activities such as cheese making class and cooking lessons.

Visit a blue zone island where locals enjoy a long life (Ikaria)

Alexandros Dedoukos/Getty Images

The island of Ikaria is small but mighty, as evidenced by its Blue Zone status which states that Icarians have longer lifespans than most people in the world. Adopt the Mediterranean diet (goat cheese and honey from the island are a must), take part in a wellness retreattake a siesta on Messakti beach and do as the locals do.

Have your own “Mamma Mia!” » adventure (Skopelos)

Izzet Keribar/Getty Images

The small island of Skopelos is where “Mammia Mia!” was filmed, and a ferry ride is all that separates you from your own Meryl Streep-inspired adventure. As well as its superb beaches, visit the historic capital, Chora, and its churches, castles and monasteries, explore the forest of Mount Delfi and pass by the chapel of Agios Ioannis, where Meryl Streep runs at the end of the “Winner Takes All” scene.

Go on a hiking quest (Corfu)

Hugo Goudswaard/Getty Images

Corfu is the second largest island in the Ionian Sea, so you know there’s plenty of unspoiled land to explore. There’s the Corfu Trail, a long-distance route that guides walkers through the island’s diverse landscapes. If you have several days on hand you can do the full 111 miles, otherwise you can join the trail where is closest to you.

Visit the sanctuary of Delphi, where the oracle of Apollo once spoke (Delphi)

Stefan Cristian Cioata/Getty Images

The archaeological site of Delphi is a Unesco World Heritage and the house where the oracle of Apollo at Delphi once spoke. In ancient times, people came from near and far to visit this religious center and receive an oracle from the Pythia, the priestess of Apollo.

Get your dose of multicultural history (Thessaloniki)

Dimitrios Tilis/Getty Images

While ancient Greek history will always reign supreme in Greece, the city of Thessaloniki is historically known for its religious diversity seen through its many museums and monuments: the jewish museumthe Roman Agorathe Ataturk’s Housethe Rotundathe Archaeological Museumto name a few.

Dine on the island where the Greek cookbook was invented (Sifnos)

Christian Marquardt/Getty Images

Sifnos is home to the first cookbook ever published in Greece in the early 1900s, written by Nicolas Tselementes, and the emphasis on food on this Cycladic island is still relevant. Eat across Sifnos adding these dishes to your favourites: revithada (chickpea stew) lamb mastelo (simmered braised lamb), revithokeftedes (fried chickpea dumplings) and melopita (honey pie) for dessert.

Bathing in natural hot springs (Evia)

Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images

Do as the ancient Greeks did and soak in the natural hot springs. The island of Euboea, or Evia, is home to Edipsos, one of Greece’s most famous spa towns, and visitors travel far and near for the potential healing effects of the hot springs.

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Investors flock to student accommodation; decline in wine sales; and pizza delivery wars – The Irish Times https://vinivert.com/investors-flock-to-student-accommodation-decline-in-wine-sales-and-pizza-delivery-wars-the-irish-times/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 05:31:05 +0000 https://vinivert.com/investors-flock-to-student-accommodation-decline-in-wine-sales-and-pizza-delivery-wars-the-irish-times/ Strong demand for student accommodation has fueled substantial interest from real estate investors so far this year, according to a new market update. Ian Curran reports on Cushman & Wakefield research, which shows that the purpose-built student accommodation sector accounted for nearly a fifth of investment in Ireland’s rental housing sector in the first half […]]]>

Strong demand for student accommodation has fueled substantial interest from real estate investors so far this year, according to a new market update. Ian Curran reports on Cushman & Wakefield research, which shows that the purpose-built student accommodation sector accounted for nearly a fifth of investment in Ireland’s rental housing sector in the first half of the year.

Soaring chicken feed costs Put pressure on Profits from Moy Park, headquartered in Armagh, last year, writes Mark Paul. The company, owned by Brazilian meat giant JBS, saw its profits fall by more than half despite an increase in revenue.

Wine sales plummeted last year after a record year in 2020, according to new data from Drinks Ireland. Eoin Burke-Kennedy reports that wine sales were down 13%, with the drop tied to the reopening of hospitality venues, where customers typically prefer other beverages.

The American information management company Iron Mountain has signed an agreement with Iput to rent more than 15,000 m² of space at Aerodrome Business Park in South West Dublin. Ian Curran has details of the deal, which sees the Boston group join Life Style Sports as the park’s tenants.

In his Caution column, Mark Paul considers the potential for ‘greed’ in the Irish market as inflation soars in the economy. He notes that grocery price growth is at its highest level in 15 years and wonders if retailers might ever be tempted to use that as an excuse to pass on larger-than-needed price increases.

Mark also takes an in-depth look at the state pizza delivery market, which he says has attracted powerful backers with deep pockets and big ideas in recent years. Industry sources tell him, however, that a post-Covid jolt from some of the smaller operators could be imminent as inflation bites.

John Fitz Gerald this week focuses on the food processing sector, assessing its importance to the farming community. Both parts of the food economy will need to evolve to cope with climate change, he writes.

In our Work section, Sarah O’Connor assesses research that considers the impact of workplace harassment on female and male victims and perpetrators. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the results differ considerably.

Separately, Olive Keogh speaks to a professional who made a great and happy change to his career just as the state entered its period of continued Covid lockdown in 2020.

This week wild goose is Elaine Herlihy, a Sydney-based marketing expert who hails from a small dairy farm in Knocknagoshel Co Kerry. Herlihy, who spent the summer working from her childhood bedroom, tells Barbara McCarthy about her journey through a business degree and an advanced degree in marketing practice and how she always had an “outside eye”.

Stay up to date with all our business news – subscribe to our Business Today daily news digest via email.

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