Wine processing – Vini Vert http://vinivert.com/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 01:10:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://vinivert.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-5-120x120.png Wine processing – Vini Vert http://vinivert.com/ 32 32 For the elderly, smelling roses can be more difficult https://vinivert.com/for-the-elderly-smelling-roses-can-be-more-difficult/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 18:33:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/for-the-elderly-smelling-roses-can-be-more-difficult/ Through Judith Graham The reports of covid-19 patients are baffling. Just hours before, they’d been enjoying a hot cup of coffee or the scent of flowers in a garden. Then, as if a switch had been flipped, those smells disappeared. Young and old are affected – more than 80 to 90% of people diagnosed with […]]]>

Through Judith Graham

The reports of covid-19 patients are baffling. Just hours before, they’d been enjoying a hot cup of coffee or the scent of flowers in a garden. Then, as if a switch had been flipped, those smells disappeared.

Young and old are affected – more than 80 to 90% of people diagnosed with the virus, by some estimates. While most people recover in a matter of months, 16% take six months or more to do so, research shows. Up to 1.6 million Americans have chronic odor problems due to covid, new estimates show.

The elderly are particularly vulnerable, suggest the experts. “We know that many older people have a compromised sense of smell to begin with. Add to that the covid insult, and it made these problems worse, ”said Dr. Jayant Pinto, professor of surgery and specialist in sinus and nose disease at the University of Chicago Medical Center.

Recent data show the interaction between covid, old age and loss of smell. When Italian researchers assessed 101 hospital patients with mild to moderate covid, 50 showed objective signs of altered smell six months later. People 65 and over were almost twice as likely to be impaired; those 75 or older were more than 2.5 times more likely.

Most people are unaware of the extent to which smell can be diminished later in life. More than half of those aged 65 to 80 have some degree of loss of smell or odor dysfunction, as is known in the scientific literature. This goes up to 80% for even older people. Those affected often report concerns about safety, a lack of enjoyment in eating, and an impaired quality of life.

But because the ability to detect, identify, and distinguish smells gradually declines, most older people – up to 75% of those with some degree of odor loss – don’t realize they’re affected. .

A host of factors are thought to contribute to age-related odor loss, including a reduction in the number of olfactory sensory neurons in the nose, which are essential for detecting odor; changes in the stem cells that make these neurons every few months; atrophy of the smell processing center in the brain, called the olfactory bulb; and the narrowing of brain centers closely related to the olfactory bulb, such as the hippocampus, a central region for learning and memory.

In addition, substances toxic to the environment such as air pollution play a role, according to the research. “The olfactory neurons in your nose are basically little pieces of your brain that hang out in the outside world,” and their exposure over time damages these neurons and the tissues that support them, explained Pamela Dalton, senior researcher at Monell Chemical Senses Center. , a smell and taste research institute in Philadelphia.

Yet the complex workings of the olfactory system have yet to be mapped in detail, and much remains unknown, said Dr Sandeep Robert Datta, professor of neurobiology at Harvard Medical School.

“We tend to think of our sense of smell as primarily aesthetic,” he said. “What is very clear is that it is much more important. The olfactory system plays a key role in maintaining our emotional well-being and connecting us with the world.

Datta experienced this after undergoing a bone marrow transplant followed by chemotherapy years ago. Unable to smell or taste the food, he said, he felt “very disoriented” in his surroundings.

Common consequences of loss of smell include loss of appetite (odorless, taste is deeply compromised), difficulty monitoring personal hygiene, depression, and an inability to detect harmful fumes. In the elderly, it can lead to weight loss, malnutrition, frailty, inadequate personal care and accidents caused by gas leaks or fires.

Jerome Pisano, 75, of Bloomington, Ill., Has lived with a loss of smell for the past five years. Repeated tests and consultations with doctors have not identified the reason for this illness, and at times he feels “desperate”, admitted Pisano.

Before becoming fragrant, Pisano was a certified wine specialist. It has an 800-bottle wine cellar. “I can’t enjoy this as much as I would like. I miss the smell of cut grass. Flowers. My wife cooks, he said. “It certainly diminishes my quality of life. “

Loss of smell is also associated in various research studies with a higher risk of death in the elderly. A study, written by Pinto and colleagues, found that older people with odor dysfunction were nearly three times more likely to die over a five-year period than older people whose sense of smell remained intact.

“Our sense of smell indicates how well our nervous system is and how well our brain is overall,” Pinto said. According to a review published earlier this year, 90% of people with early-stage Parkinson’s disease and more than 80% of people with Alzheimer’s disease have olfactory dysfunction – a symptom that may precede others. symptoms of several years.

There is no treatment for the loss of smell associated with neurological disease or head trauma, but if someone has persistent sinus problems or allergies that cause congestion, an over-the-counter antihistamine or a steroid nasal spray can help. Usually the smell returns within a few weeks.

For the loss of odor following a viral infection, the picture is less clear. It is not yet clear which viruses are associated with odor dysfunction, why they damage the sense of smell, and what trajectory recovery takes. Covid can help shed light on this as it has inspired a wave of research on scent loss across the world.

“What characteristics make people more vulnerable to persistent loss of smell after a virus?” We don’t know, but I think we’ll find out because this research is ongoing and we have never had a cohort [of people with smell loss] this great to study, ”said Dalton, of the Monell Center.

Some experts recommend training in smell, noting evidence of effectiveness and no indication of danger. This involves sniffing four separate scents (often eucalyptus, lemon, rose, and clove) twice a day for 30 seconds each, usually for four weeks. Sometimes the practice is combined with images of the objects felt, a form of visual reinforcement.

The theory is that “practice, practice, practice” will stimulate the olfactory system, said Charles Greer, professor of neurosurgery and neuroscience at the Yale School of Medicine. While scientific backing is not well established, he said, he often recommends that people who think their scent is waning “get a shelf full of spices and smell them regularly.”

Richard Doty, director of the Smell and Taste Center at the University of Pennsylvania, remains skeptical. He writes a review of smell training and notes that 20-30% of people with viral infections and loss of smell recover in a relatively short time, whether or not they continue this therapy.

“The main thing we recommend is to avoid polluted environments and get your full vitamin intake,” as several vitamins play an important role in maintaining the olfactory system, he said.

We look forward to hearing from readers about the questions you would like to answer, the issues you are having with your care, and the advice you need to deal with the healthcare system. Visit khn.org/columnists to submit your inquiries or advice.


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Why are Colorado beans so delicious? https://vinivert.com/why-are-colorado-beans-so-delicious/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 00:40:43 +0000 https://vinivert.com/why-are-colorado-beans-so-delicious/ Photo by Sarah Banks Eat and drink Farmers have been growing beans in southwest Colorado for almost 1,000 years. Here’s why they should be in your pantry this winter. By Kelly Bastone 5280 December 2021 “People swear our beans just taste better,” says Denise Pribble, who wears a magenta sweatshirt and earrings to match her […]]]>
Photo by Sarah Banks

Eat and drink

Farmers have been growing beans in southwest Colorado for almost 1,000 years. Here’s why they should be in your pantry this winter.


“People swear our beans just taste better,” says Denise Pribble, who wears a magenta sweatshirt and earrings to match her cropped burgundy hair. The 64-year-old daughter of a pinto bean farmer, Pribble owns and operates Adobe Milling Company, a retail store and processing plant that cleans, bags and distributes many beans grown around Dove Creek, at 35 miles northwest of Cortez. Whitewater paddlers know Dove Creek as the starting point for float trips on the Dolores River, which runs through a deep canyon on the city’s eastern border. Foodies, however, recognize Dove Creek as the “Pinto Bean Center of the World”.

This is the slogan that once greeted motorists in this farming community. For approximately four decades, starting in the 1950s, Dove Creek celebrated the supremacy of its beans with an annual recipe competition that bestowed top honors on a “Queen of Pinto Beans” (regardless of whether some ribbon winners were men). Today, Dove Creek’s welcome sign simply says it’s a “Somewhere Special,” but its reputation for producing top-quality pulses (dried legume seeds) lives on.

Each year, the region harvests between three million and 30 million pounds of beans, depending on rainfall and farmers’ crop rotations. A cult of home cooks, barbecue contestants, and restaurateurs eagerly scavenges not only pintos, but Dove Creek’s lesser-known Anasazi, black, bolitas and lesser-known varieties, all of which are all ideal for soups, stews and stews. winter accompaniments. dishes. If these beans walked on all fours, they would be as praised as the wagyu.

The reason behind the prominence of beans is a matter of debate, however. “Colorado dry beans are known for their bright, vibrant color and delicious flavor,” says Bob Schork, director of the Colorado Dry Bean Committee, which researches and promotes bean production in the state. “We believe this is because it is grown at a higher elevation than other beans in the United States.”

Pribble attributes a different natural input: the reddish-colored earth of Dove Creek. “Like the places where the best peaches or the best corn grow, our soil just seems to produce the best beans,” she says as truckers and locals who drive RVs and locals carrying burlap sacks of beans pass by. in front of the Adobe Milling register.

Or maybe, some say, Dove Creek beans are better because their theoretical roots run deeper: The ancient Pueblo and their modern descendants grew beans (as well as corn and squash) in the area for nearly 1000 years old, as evidenced by the beans and jars of beans found among archaeological sites in Mesa Verde National Park and Hovenweep National Monument. Maybe this land embraces this long relationship, or maybe the magic lies in the grains themselves.

Like the ancestral Puebloans before them, many farmers in Dove Creek grow beans without irrigation, allowing them to grow at a more leisurely pace than the well-watered plants, perhaps picking up more flavor in a process reminiscent of how wine grapes reflect their terroir. Dry cultivation also reduces the number of pests and diseases that attack bean plants, so growers do not need to use fertilizers or pesticides.

These conditions combine to produce beans with thinner skins, a dream scenario for restaurant and home chefs alike as they usually don’t need to be pre-soaked. Additionally, bolitas, a variety long loved by communities in the San Luis Valley for its high protein content and rich taste, actually absorb the seasonings through their skin when cooked, allowing the aromas to mingle. with velvety interiors.

A Dove Creek resident in front of the town’s welcome sign in 1980. Photo by Denver Post via Getty Images

Of course, not all Colorado growers avoid irrigation – flavorful pintos, light red kidneys, yellow Mayocobas, black beans, chickpeas, and red and black eyed peas are grown, sometimes with extra water, in various corners of the Centennial State, but the dryland specimens in the southwest corner rank at the top of all legumes, especially when fresh. “Because we get them so close to harvest, the beans impart a rich nutty flavor,” says Holly Arnold Kinney, culinary director of The Fort in Morrison, where chefs use Dove Creek Anasazi and pinto beans in the dish. side dish with restaurant potatoes. Plus, “the texture is creamier,” says Angelina LaRue Lopez, recipe developer and food columnist from Idalou, Texas, who swears by the sweetness and lack of chalk of Dove Creek beans to make a pinto dish. classic: refried beans.

Bessie White’s stove is topped with jars filled with lightly bubbling pie filling. Jars of gem-colored apricots, strawberry rhubarb and berry jam lie in boxes on the floor, waiting to be delivered to Cortez’s Saturday Farmer’s Market. At 91, White still delivers her homemade treats to the produce stand she’s been working with since the 1970s, when she and her sister founded the outdoor bazaar. But White doesn’t just sell fruit; she also sells dried beans grown by her son and grandson. Said White, “There’s nothing better than a pinto bean. “

White, however, has a unique history on another impulse that the region is widely known for. In 1973, she says she was working at the local elementary school when a student showed up with a handful of pretty beans she had found among nearby Native American archaeological sites. “There were burial grounds everywhere, and you would find them when you plowed your fields. The student’s father was digging a ruin and found a pot of beans, ”said White, who planted some in his garden. She ended up with a harvest the size of a quarter of shiny beans speckled with red and white.

The variety, which may have come from the Lukachukai Mountains of northeastern Arizona despite White’s recollection of their finding in what is now the Hovenweep National Monument, ultimately became Anasazi. Although the word has long been used to describe ancestral Puebloans, modern Pueblo tribes have pointed out that it is a derogatory term in the Navajo language. As such, people are now referred to as Ancestral Puebloans, while the lightly sweet, quick-cooking bean is stuck with a nickname that loosely translates to “enemy ancestors.”

Despite its name, the Anasazi bean is a much less formidable enemy to the human gastrointestinal system than many other varieties. Containing only 25 percent of the gas-producing compounds found in most beans, Anasazis trigger much less gas than a typical pinto. Sensing the commercial potential of the rediscovered strain, Ernie Waller, who owned Adobe Milling before Pribble and her husband bought the company in 2003, got a brand for the Anasazi bean in 1989. Call it Anglo appropriation or chain of events that probably saved the variety from extinction; in any case, the brand protects the genetics of the seeds and guarantees that only this variety is marketed under the name Anasazi.

No matter what they are called – or what variety the nonagenarian (still) throws 10-pound bags in his black van – White says southwest Colorado beans have been a long part of his life. And it doesn’t take much incentive to tout their dominance. “Yes,” she said. “I think our beans are just better.”

Visit the Adobe Milling Company website to purchase Dove Creek-grown Anasazi, Pinto, and Black Beans in quantities ranging from 1 to 40 pounds, or call 800-542-3623 to order by phone.

This article appeared in the December 2021 issue of 5280.


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To sell https://vinivert.com/to-sell/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 02:51:13 +0000 https://vinivert.com/to-sell/ December 1, 2021 Charity is part of Oregon wine DNA By Paul Omundson Whether you call it Christmas, Diwali, Kwanzaa or Hanukkah, the holidays are about giving. If only the season of charity was encouraged throughout the year. For many winegrowers, this is the case. In September 2020, a major fire started at the northern […]]]>

Charity is part of Oregon wine DNA


By Paul Omundson

Whether you call it Christmas, Diwali, Kwanzaa or Hanukkah, the holidays are about giving. If only the season of charity was encouraged throughout the year. For many winegrowers, this is the case.

In September 2020, a major fire started at the northern end of Ashland. Fueled by high winds, the Alameda fire swept down a nine mile path, destroying nearly 3,000 structures and killing three. Leeward, Simple Machine Winery in Talent Town was totally destroyed. An inventory of 30 barrels and 20,000 bottles of wine was destroyed in a pile of ashes. Tools and equipment were made redundant.

As his cellar was engulfed in flames – everyone was evacuated to safety – Simple Machine co-owner Brian Denner recalls a phone call he received from Jim Bernau, CEO / President of Willamette Valley Vineyards, asking if everyone was safe and what he could do to help.

“Out of the blue, he calls,” Denner marvels. “One of Oregon’s biggest wineries helps one of the smaller ones,” noting that he and his wife / business partner, Clea Arthur, are all of Simple Machine’s staff.

Bernau’s appeal and generous donation of fruit helped the couple see a way forward, and that was just the start. What followed was a huge wave of help from their own Rogue Valley wine community.

The couple’s friend, Brian Gruber of Barrel 42 in nearby Medford, led a campaign to stock up on donated fruit for Simple Machine, so they could keep producing. “We crushed over 27 tonnes of fruit last year, about half of which was donated. This is the most ever for us under the Simple Machine label, ”says Denner. “It allowed us to continue. “

Gruber’s business partners Herb Quady of Quady North and Nicole Schulte warmly welcomed the suddenly homeless Operation Simple Machine to their facility five miles away.

“They invited us at the height of harvest activity. There really was no room, ”says Denner. “But they made room.” Denner then became a full time member of the Barrel 42 harvest team, working every day to help make the wines for Barrel 42. Later that day he was working on the wines for Simple Machine. Gruber, Quady and their staff took care of fermenting the Simple Machine at times when Denner couldn’t be there.

Meanwhile, as the couple rebuilt, donations of equipment and tools poured in. Denner has also generated much needed new cash flow with “futures,” an arrangement whereby customers pay up front for wines to be made and delivered in the future.

The recovery effort culminated with the reopening of a new 2,700 square foot cellar and tasting room built on the cement slab healed by ash from the original structure. “This blackened ground adds character,” says Arthur. “It makes us humble and reminds us of how far we have been able to come thanks to so much generosity. “

Three months ago, with only generator power at the start, they started making wine in their new facility. They are now fully operational with the recent opening of their tasting room.

Things turned around at harvest this year when Gruber’s press broke at barrel 42. “I was very happy to have helped crush his grapes,” says Denner.

In a nice ‘re-gift’ twist, imagine winemaker Eric Weisinger’s surprise when Denner showed up recently to personally present him a case of Pinot Noir at Weisinger Family Winery in Ashland. The wine was made from fruit Weisinger donated to Simple Machine last year. Denner also surprised him with a designated vineyard on the label. “Ah, he didn’t have to do that,” Weisinger said, visibly touched by the gesture.

Asked about the daily “freebies” from winemakers, Weisinger spoke about his own interactions with other area winemakers, Rob Folin of Ryan Rose Wine and Kiley Evans of 2Hawk Vineyard & Winery.

“Rob and I help each other a lot during the harvest. When one of us is out of supply (like tartaric acid), the other is always ready to provide. The three of us share wine information and little discoveries. Rob even came over to help me out on big days when I ran out. And this year, Kiley was able to get me some fruit. It’s a collaboration that helps us all.

“I loaned all kinds of equipment to colleagues including barrels, racks, tanks, yeast, ML bacteria, lab reagents, bottles, corks, all kinds of things Evans adds. “But I think the most important thing we shared this year was the harvest staff. Our guys helped where needed and the other valley crews stepped in when we needed a big harvest crew. We all shared the work to bring it all in.

For winemakers, charity is more than just equipment, supplies, or even personnel. “We always compare, share ideas,” explains Folin. “Maybe one of us hits more often, does it in the morning, not in the evening. All kinds of slight differences. With people you trust, you can talk to each other about what you notice. be that in Malbec the tannins are really aggressive so we’ll talk about that and might change the fermentation temperature.

Folin has abundant laboratory equipment that he is happy to use for his colleagues in need of laboratory work. “If someone wants alcohol percentages, we can do a whole barrel in half an hour,” he says. “We can get information for you very quickly. I get a lot of six packs of beer dropped off here for doing this stuff.

Folin admits that the wine industry’s culture of sharing, swapping and moving supplies as needed isn’t just a Rogue Valley phenomenon. “It’s common all over Oregon. ”


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East Carolina to play at Military Bowl 2021 https://vinivert.com/east-carolina-to-play-at-military-bowl-2021/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 16:07:45 +0000 https://vinivert.com/east-carolina-to-play-at-military-bowl-2021/ Soccer November 27, 2021 History links Bowl announcement comments WASHINGTON – East Carolina University will represent the American Athletic Conference at Military Bowl 2021 presented by Peraton, benefiting the USO. The Pirates will make their first bowl appearance since the 2014 season against an opponent from the Atlantic Coast Conference on Monday, December 27 at […]]]>

Soccer

Bowl announcement comments

WASHINGTON – East Carolina University will represent the American Athletic Conference at Military Bowl 2021 presented by Peraton, benefiting the USO. The Pirates will make their first bowl appearance since the 2014 season against an opponent from the Atlantic Coast Conference on Monday, December 27 at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis. Kicks off at 2:30 p.m. ET and the game will be televised on ESPN.

“We are delighted to invite East Carolina and look forward to welcoming a large contingent of Pirate fans to the National Capital Region,” said Military Bowl President and Executive Director Steve Beck. “East Carolina is in the middle of a great season and we can feel the excitement surrounding the team. We are looking forward to a great week and bowl game.”

East Carolina (7-5) had its most successful regular season in seven years, evidenced by a recent four-game winning streak that included a thrilling 38-35 victory at Navy. East Carolina presents a powerful attack led by the quarterback Holton Ahler, who had 3,126 yards and 18 touchdowns, while running Keaton mitchell racked up 1,131 yards and nine touchdowns. Defensively, the Pirates gave up just 26.3 points per game in 2021, their smallest number since 2015.

“We are delighted to accept an invitation to the Military Bowl and to represent East Carolina University, our community and all of Eastern North Carolina,” said the East Carolina Athletic Director. Jon gilbert noted. “Steve Beck and his Military Bowl team are well known for producing a first class bowl experience and we appreciate the opportunity to play in the playoffs against an ACC opponent.

“The pirate football program is riding under Mike houstonthe direction of. We have all witnessed growth and improvement over the past three years and today’s announcement is the culmination of the hard work, sacrifice and dedication of the young men in our football program. We look forward to Pirate Nation joining us for this Military Bowl experience. “

This will be the Pirates’ second appearance in the Military Bowl. East Carolina fell to Maryland, 51-20, in the 2010 game, which set a Bowl attendance record with 38,062 fans.

The Pirates have several ties to the Washington area, including six players from the region. Coach Mike houston was honored as DC Touchdown Club College Coach of the Year after leading James Madison to the Championship Division National Soccer Championship in 2016.

“I am thrilled for the young men in our program as well as our coaches, staff and administration who have worked tirelessly over the past three years for this opportunity,” said Houston. “Everyone involved in our program has given their time and commitment to make this season one to remember. It is a chance for our football program to take on an ACC opponent from driving distance for a lot in Pirate Nation. There is no doubt that Violet and Gold will represent in Annapolis. “

Tickets are on sale now. Proceeds from the bowl benefit USO and Patriot Point, the Military Bowl Foundation retreat for wounded, ill and injured service members, their families and caregivers.
2021 Military Bowl Ticket Guidelines

All ECU fans should order their Military Bowl 2021 tickets through the ECU Athletic box office from today on ECUPirates.com.

ECU fans are encouraged to order their Bowl tickets by phone or through ECUPirates.com. The ECU Athletics ticket office can be reached at (252) 328-4500. Fans can also contact the Pirate Club for more information at (252) 737-4540.

Pirate Club members are given priority over seat allocation, based on the priority point system, by placing their orders at the ECU Athletics ticket office by Monday, December 13. All other seat allocation orders will be on a first come, first served basis. Bowl tickets range from $ 60 to $ 100 plus a $ 10 processing fee per order. Ticket limit guidelines will be based on availability for as wide distribution as possible to all fans.

ECU Athletics and the Pirate Club will also sell 180 game tickets on a first-come, first-serve basis for $ 150 in the Minter Pavilion, a state-of-the-art hospitality suite located in the southeast corner of Navy-Marine Corps. Memorial Stadium, with the entrance next to section E. The area includes an all-you-can-eat buffet and cash bar (beer, wine and liquor) in a large air-conditioned hall with ample seating. This reception area has large screens showing the game and a view of the action on the pitch from the terrace overlooking the pitch. These tickets go on sale Monday, November 29 at 10 a.m. Individuals should call the Pirate Club at (252) 737-4540 to place their order. These tickets will go quickly, so please call the Pirate Club on Monday.

One block of Bowl tickets is reserved for ECU students. These tickets will be available for purchase for $ 60 by ECU students with a deadline of December 8th. ECU students can purchase tickets on a first come, first served basis. Students must present their valid ECU ID card in order to purchase these designated tickets. All student tickets unsold and not purchased before December 8 will be available to all fans.

The ECU Bowl ticket allocation consists of all side tickets, with most tickets located between the 20 meter lines. The $ 100 bills are located in section 29 of the lower level. The $ 80 tickets are located in Sections 30 and 31 on the lower level. The $ 70 bills are located in sections 126 and 131 of the upper level. $ 60 bills can be found in sections 125 and 132 of the upper level.

About the Military Bowl presented by Peraton

The Military Bowl presented by Peraton, for the benefit of the USO is the National Capital Region’s post-season college football bowl game broadcast on ESPN and featuring teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference and the American Athletic Conference at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis , in Maryland. Hosted by the Military Bowl Foundation, the Bowl’s mission is to benefit our nation’s service members, including a partnership with USO-Metro and the operation of Patriot Point, a retreat for recovering service members, their families and caregivers on the east coast of Maryland. For the latest updates, visit Militarybowl.org, follow @MilitaryBowl on Twitter and Instagram and like Military Bowl on Facebook! Military Bowl 2021 kicks off on December 27 at 2:30 p.m. ET. Tickets are on sale now.

About the Military Bowl Foundation
The Military bowl foundation is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization that organizes premier events in the National Capital Region for the benefit of our country’s military. Originally created to create the region’s first-ever college football game, the Foundation now operates not only the Military Bowl presented by Peraton, but also the DC Touchdown Club and Patriot Point, a retreat for recovering military personnel, their families. families and caregivers on Maryland’s east coast. The Foundation holds engaging events throughout the year to raise funds and educate members of the military service, which has a direct impact on those who give so much of themselves for the country.



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Many in the UK could spend a Christmas without wine and alcohol https://vinivert.com/many-in-the-uk-could-spend-a-christmas-without-wine-and-alcohol/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 17:55:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/many-in-the-uk-could-spend-a-christmas-without-wine-and-alcohol/ The warning was made in a letter sent by the UK Wine and Spirit Trade Association (WTSA) to UK Transport Secretary Grant Shapps last week. It was signed by 48 members of the industry association, including champagne and cognac producers Moet Hennessy, owned by LVMH (LVMHF), and Laurent-Perrier. “This is an urgent issue for our […]]]>
The warning was made in a letter sent by the UK Wine and Spirit Trade Association (WTSA) to UK Transport Secretary Grant Shapps last week. It was signed by 48 members of the industry association, including champagne and cognac producers Moet Hennessy, owned by LVMH (LVMHF), and Laurent-Perrier.

“This is an urgent issue for our businesses, and it is imperative that [the UK] The government is taking immediate action to help alleviate the impact of the pre-Christmas driver shortage crisis, ”the letter said.

Industry wants help with better routing of cargo from ports, as well as more regular updates from the government on how quickly it processes test drives and heavy-duty (PL) driver’s licenses .

He also urged the government to extend for one year a temporary visa program allowing overseas drivers to fill in the gaps in the longer term. The three-month program is scheduled to expire on February 28 of next year.

“We are already seeing significant delays in delivery times for wines and spirits, increasing costs and limiting the range of products available to UK consumers,” WSTA Managing Director Miles Beale said in a statement. .

In 2019, 54% of adults in England reported drinking alcohol at least once a week, according to a UK parliament study.

The Beverage Industry Association said it took some of its members up to five times longer to import wine and spirits than a year ago. He also said costs are rising have been passed on to importers by freight forwarders who have to pay more for rare drivers.

Ed Baker, Managing Director of Kingsland Drinks wine distributor, said his company refills around 185 million bottles of wine each year, or “about one in eight bottles” drunk in the UK.

The backlog of deliveries mean container spaces at rail hubs are in high demand, he said in a statement.

“We would normally expect to have 80 to 100 tank locations, but at the moment we can be down from 10 to 20. This limits the amount of liquid arriving at our plant and adds to the shortage of weight drivers. heavy-duty deliveries, “says Boulanger.

The UK government said in a statement that it did not expect a disruption in the supply of alcohol on Christmas.

“The government has acted quickly to address the challenges in our supply chains, which have been triggered by global pressures, including the pandemic and the international shortage of heavy truck drivers,” a government spokesperson said.

The shortage of truck drivers sparked a fuel crisis earlier this year, with many gas stations closed and long lines for those lucky enough to stock up. In September, the British government deployed Army tankers to fill fuel supply gaps.
Supermarkets have also been struggling for months to keep their shelves fully stocked amid a tight supply chain caused by the pandemic and worker shortages caused in part by the country’s departure from the European Union.

Some EU workers left after Brexit, and farms, food processing factories and trucking companies can no longer recruit in the European Union due to new UK immigration rules.

The government issued 5,000 temporary visas for foreign drivers, but the UK’s Road Haulage Association said Britain needed 100,000 more drivers to meet demand.

Farmers, bankers, retailers, logistics companies and restaurateurs have all warned the government in recent months that tougher immigration rules put in place after Britain left the European Union was preventing them to find workers and run their businesses.


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J. Rickards Winery, 2019 One Lone Row, Alexander Valley, Sonoma County Grenache https://vinivert.com/j-rickards-winery-2019-one-lone-row-alexander-valley-sonoma-county-grenache/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 01:36:27 +0000 https://vinivert.com/j-rickards-winery-2019-one-lone-row-alexander-valley-sonoma-county-grenache/ Is your Thanksgiving feast an embarrassment of wealth? Not if you have the right red to control these hedonistic dishes. The flavor profile of the “good” red is that of tangy, tangy fruit supported by crisp acidity. While grape varieties with this profile span the gamut, strong candidates include Pinot Noir, Rhône red blends and […]]]>

Is your Thanksgiving feast an embarrassment of wealth?

Not if you have the right red to control these hedonistic dishes. The flavor profile of the “good” red is that of tangy, tangy fruit supported by crisp acidity. While grape varieties with this profile span the gamut, strong candidates include Pinot Noir, Rhône red blends and Grenache.

The winner of the recent Press Democrat Thanksgiving Red Blind Tasting is a Grenache – the J. Rickards Winery, 2019 One Lone Row, Alexander Valley, Sonoma County Grenache at $ 29. This wine can stand up to the most decadent dishes – foods high in complex carbohydrates and rich, fatty sauces – with its crunchy acidity and tangy fruit. Red weighted, it has aromas and flavors of cherry, pomegranate and cranberry. Racy with a spicy background, it has a nice length and is impressive from start to finish.

Other awesome Thanksgiving picks include: Benovia, Pinot Noir Tilton Hill Sonoma Coast 2019 for $ 70; Antiquum Farm Juel, Pinot Noir Willamette Valley 2019, $ 50; Rams Gate, 2018 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir Cellar Note, $ 58; and Pedroncelli, 2019 Bench Vineyards Sonoma County Dry Creek Valley Merlot at $ 20.

As for Grenache J. Rickards, winemaker Blaine Brazil said it was the perfect Thanksgiving wine because it has fruity flavors paired with crisp acidity.

“The standard roast turkey is obviously a good choice, and our tasting room manager is roasting a goose again,” Brazil said. “Our King Salmon Wellington recipe is another excellent pairing, served cold as a starter. Any salmon dish would be great.

The winemaker said that J. Rickards’ small batch production brings out the best in Grenache.

“We use a light touch of French Burgundy barrels, allowing the brilliant fruit flavors to shine,” Brazil said. “And Alexander Valley is an exceptional region for growing Grenache, with vines dating back 80 years or more. “

The winery has been growing and selling wine grapes in Alexander Valley since 1976, when winemaker Jim Rickards worked full time as a registered nurse in the intensive care unit at Memorial Hospital in Santa Rosa. Rickards started making wine in 1991 for his family and friends, then opened his commercial winery in 2005. He now produces around 5,000 cases a year.

This year marks Brazil’s 11th harvest at the cellar. The winemaker, 41, holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Cal Poly SLO in Fruit Science with a minor in Wine and Viticulture. He spent six years with BR Cohn in Sonoma Valley before joining J. Rickards.

Grenache, Brazil said, can be finicky. But he doesn’t mind the challenge, especially during Thanksgiving, as wine is at its best as a food pairing.

“Grenache is a difficult grape to grow because it usually produces a large harvest and needs to be managed with care to reduce the fruit load at the right time,” he said. “The management of the vine is very important to have the potential to make a great wine. Gentle processing and the best barrels of French Burgundy create a remarkable, fruity, complex and silky wine.

Wine writer Peg Melnik can be reached at peg.melnik@pressdemocrat.com or 707-521-5310.


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Your Thanksgiving meal will cost more this year in New York City. here’s why https://vinivert.com/your-thanksgiving-meal-will-cost-more-this-year-in-new-york-city-heres-why/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 09:25:16 +0000 https://vinivert.com/your-thanksgiving-meal-will-cost-more-this-year-in-new-york-city-heres-why/ Expect supply chain issues to be a topic of conversation around the Thanksgiving dinner table. After all, the difficulties in getting the goods to people can have an impact on what you eat. According to the New York Farm Bureau, rising food prices reflect some of the supply and demand issues, largely related to the […]]]>

Expect supply chain issues to be a topic of conversation around the Thanksgiving dinner table. After all, the difficulties in getting the goods to people can have an impact on what you eat.

According to the New York Farm Bureau, rising food prices reflect some of the supply and demand issues, largely related to the ongoing pandemic and increased home food consumption.

For What It’s Worth, the Office’s 2021 Market Basket Survey, which shows the price of a traditional Thanksgiving dinner, shows the average total price, which includes a 16-pound turkey and other common items found on a holiday dinner table, is $ 52.59, a 1.7% increase over last year.

Fifty euros isn’t negligible, but the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 36th Annual Informal National Price Survey found that the average national cost of this year’s holiday is $ 53.31, or 72 cents more than New York’s figure.


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Where I live: Leon Springs https://vinivert.com/where-i-live-leon-springs/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/where-i-live-leon-springs/ The Where I Live series aims to showcase our diverse city and region by highlighting its many vibrant neighborhoods. Each week a local resident invites us and shows us what makes their neighborhood special. Have we ever been to your neighborhood? Contact us to share your story. Leon Springs on the northwest side of San […]]]>

The Where I Live series aims to showcase our diverse city and region by highlighting its many vibrant neighborhoods. Each week a local resident invites us and shows us what makes their neighborhood special. Have we ever been to your neighborhood? Contact us to share your story.

Leon Springs on the northwest side of San Antonio is a family friendly neighborhood with great schools and access to everything you need. Although quite suburban, Leon Springs is a bustling community with friendly and diverse neighbors who genuinely care about each other.

When we first moved here in 2013 after passing our townhouse in the medical center, this part of San Antonio was still semi-rural and reminded me of my hometown. Our street was a dead end with no development beyond and a cow pasture down the road.

I grew up in rural Indiana and after meeting my husband Orlando in college, I decided to move to his hometown of San Antonio. Although I have only been there a few times, it was an easy decision for me to choose the city with a warm climate and a vibrant culture.


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The Italian wine region that reveals its potential https://vinivert.com/the-italian-wine-region-that-reveals-its-potential/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 15:11:30 +0000 https://vinivert.com/the-italian-wine-region-that-reveals-its-potential/ The Castello di Semivicoli wine resort in Abruzzo, Italy. Dana Bruneau (C & Co.) In the fall, the rugged hills around Italy’s Abruzzo region buzz with activity as the harvest begins across all expanses of vineyards. Tractors climb the hillside, laden with juicy loads of Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Trebbiano and Pecorino grapes. These names may appear […]]]>

In the fall, the rugged hills around Italy’s Abruzzo region buzz with activity as the harvest begins across all expanses of vineyards. Tractors climb the hillside, laden with juicy loads of Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Trebbiano and Pecorino grapes. These names may appear regularly in reviews and wine guides, but until a few decades ago they were little appreciated. About two-thirds of the wine produced in this region still goes through consortia and sells for as little as $ 1 to $ 2 a liter, but a few private wineries are helping to enforce Abruzzo wine.

Situated between the ends of the Apennine mountains and the Adriatic Sea, Abruzzo is a region of fertile agricultural land skillfully tapped for wheat, olive trees and, of course, vines. From Castello di Semivicoli in the province of Chieti, you can see the snow-capped peak of the ominous “Mamma” Maiella massif on one side and the hazy sea horizon on the other. Castello di Semivicoli is a stately mansion owned by the Masciarelli company, which this year celebrates its 40th anniversary of wine production. Last year his Marina Cvetić Iskra Montepulciano d’Abruzzo Riserva 2016 won the platinum medal at the Decanter World Wine Awards with 97 points.

But the native Abruzzo grape varieties have not always been so successful. Indeed, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, a powerful, fruity and spicy wine, was historically shipped in bulk to Tuscany and France for blending. Even today, 60 to 70% of the wine produced in the region is grouped together in cooperative consortia and sold for a pittance.

The oenologist Attilio Alfino, who works with the company Masciarelli, suggests that it is the “humble character” of Abruzzo that holds them back. Even table wine sold for a few dollars is undervalued, he claims, but a lack of unity between the producers prevents them from pulling off a blow like the Prosecco producers in northern Veneto, who now have a multibillion-euro company.

Around 40-50 years ago, however, some growers saw the potential of the varieties indigenous to the Abruzzo region and started to raise the bar. One of these visionaries was Gianni Masciarelli. He recognized what Ian D’Agata, in his book Native grape varieties of Italy, called the “thoroughbred potential” of Montepulciano.

At the end of the 1980s, Masciarelli bought his first land. Almost 40 years later, the company has nearly 300 hectares of vineyards spread across different provinces of the Abruzzo region. Grapes include Trebbiano, Pecorino, Cocciola, and Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, the leaves turning red as fall gives way to winter.

The vines supply the seven lines of wines that the company produces today. Their top-notch Villa Gemma label includes the best of their Montepulciano d’Abruzzo DOC Riserva, a powerful wine with aging potential that produces surprising and explosive flavors. In the same line is the Bianco Colline Teatine IGT, a blend of Trebbiano, Pecorino and Coccioola grapes that has created a fresh, delicate and aromatic wine, ideal for aperitifs. The third is what the staff at Masciarelli call the “wine of friendship”. The Cerasuolo d’Abruzzo DOC is a rosé made from Montepulciano grapes with intense flavors of cherry and a little sparkle with a “great capacity for rejoicing”.

The Marina Cvetić line, which Gianni Masciarelli named and dedicated to his wife, includes a Trebbiano d’Abruzzo DOC Riserva with a complex character developed through aging in oak barrels. This range also includes a Montepulciano d’Abruzzo DOC Riserva, the company’s best-selling wine, perhaps for its skilful balance of fresh and aromatic flavors.

Masciarelli was one of the forward-looking producers who also recognized the potential of “wine tourism”. 300 kilometers away, the region of Tuscany has now perfected the formula: a spectacular villa becomes the luxurious backdrop for wine tastings and vineyard tours, with cooking classes or outdoor activities as well. Castello di Semivicoli is Abruzzo’s answer. The building dates from the 17th century and dominates the small village of Semivicoli. Guests take their breakfast in the warm ocher-colored stately kitchen (before an open fireplace in the cooler months) and can dine in different rooms of the piano nobile surrounded by period furniture under ceiling-shaped ceilings. dome decorated with frescoes.

During a cooking class, chef Carmine Fiore – who will soon be opening a restaurant in the nearby town of Casoli – reveals the world of hearty traditional Abruzzo cuisine. A particularly satisfying recipe is for pallotte, a kind of dumpling made from bread, cheese and egg. Small balls of the mixture are fried and served in a red pepper sauce. Syrah Marina Cvetić pairs wonderfully, cutting through heavy food with its tangy and fruity flavors.

When Gianni Masciarelli passed away in 2008, it is clear that he left a gaping hole not only in family life but also in the business. However, his wife Marina Cvetić admirably pursued his vision while adding her own signature flourishes. At the San Martino sulla Marrucina processing plant, a room perfectly expresses their dual ambition. Under a dark blue ceiling studded with LEDs, the Chardonnay oak barrels age slowly. This is Cvetić’s physical manifestation of Masciarelli’s famous statement that there are two wine cellars, one made of cement and the other, the larger one, the vines under the sky.


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Curaleaf Holdings, Inc. announces distribution agreement with Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits for Curaleaf Hemp and Select CBD https://vinivert.com/curaleaf-holdings-inc-announces-distribution-agreement-with-southern-glazers-wine-spirits-for-curaleaf-hemp-and-select-cbd/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/curaleaf-holdings-inc-announces-distribution-agreement-with-southern-glazers-wine-spirits-for-curaleaf-hemp-and-select-cbd/ WAKEFIELD, Mass., November 16, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Curaleaf Holdings, Inc. (CSE: CURA / OTCQX: CURLF) (“Curaleaf” or the “Company”), a leading international supplier of consumer CBD and hemp products, has today announced that it has signed a national distribution agreement with Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits (“Southern Glazer’s”), the world’s largest distributor of […]]]>

WAKEFIELD, Mass., November 16, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Curaleaf Holdings, Inc. (CSE: CURA / OTCQX: CURLF) (“Curaleaf” or the “Company”), a leading international supplier of consumer CBD and hemp products, has today announced that it has signed a national distribution agreement with Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits (“Southern Glazer’s”), the world’s largest distributor of alcoholic beverages. The deal will bring Curaleaf’s product line from their eponymous Hemp and Select CBD product lines to the Southern Glazer distribution network.

The distribution relationship combines Curaleaf’s expertise in creating high quality, non-psychoactive hemp products with Southern Glazer’s nationwide scale, unmatched go-to-market capabilities, a cutting-edge sales team and its Industry-leading Proof® e-commerce platform. , bringing operational efficiency that will drive growth within the Curaleaf family of CBD products.

Curaleaf Hemp and Select currently offer a wide range of CBD products with user-friendly formats and prices. Brands are eager to introduce new innovations to both ancillary lines with confectionery and beverages containing minor cannabinoids like CBN and CBG, allowing consumers to personalize their CBD experiences while continuing to learn which products will work best. for their unique needs.

“At Curaleaf, we are also committed to innovation and setting the highest possible standards for product quality that we are committed to customer accessibility – and our success lies not only in our ability to deliver. exceptional CBD infused products, but to distribute them to the best retail stores for safe, easy and reliable access to consumers across the country, ”said Patrick Larkin, SVP sales at Curaleaf.

“We are delighted to join forces with a global leader in beverage distribution who shares our values ​​around responsible distribution and a pioneer of a well-regulated industry,” said Joseph gennaro, Vice President of CBD, Health and Wellness at Curaleaf. “We value the expertise, efficiency and extensive network of Southern Glazer, particularly as we aim to open the consumer awareness funnel and fuel growth within our CBD business. “

“We are delighted to add Curaleaf to our distribution network as we are aligned with the future growth potential of CBD in the United States and as such we are both investing significantly in the category,” said declared David chaplin, Director of Growth, Southern Glazer’s. “Southern Glazer’s best-in-class CBD sales and marketing capability is uniquely positioned to provide the most effective route to market for Curaleaf and I am confident that we can continue to grow their portfolio. of products in retail stores across the United States. “

“I look forward to working with Curaleaf to provide industry-leading sales and service execution in Southern Glazer markets,” added Kariff Rhooms, Vice President of SG Ventures and Head of Southern Glazer’s CBD Sales Division. . “We are confident that we have the expertise and experience to engage more consumers through our retail customer network as we work with Curaleaf to continue to develop the CBD category. “

For more information, please visit CuraleafHemp.com and SelectCBD.com.

About Curaleaf Holdings
Curaleaf Holdings, Inc. (CSE: CURA) (OTCQX: CURLF) (“Curaleaf”) is a leading international supplier of cannabis-related consumer products. As a high growth cannabis company known for its quality, expertise and reliability, the company and its brands, including Curaleaf and Select, provide cutting-edge service, product selection and accessibility in the medical markets and for adult use. In United States, Curaleaf currently operates in 23 states with 111 dispensaries, 22 culture sites and more than 30 processing sites, and employs more than 5,200 team members. Curaleaf International is the largest vertically integrated cannabis company in the Europe with a unique supply and distribution network throughout the European market, bringing together pioneering science and research with state-of-the-art cultivation, extraction and production. Curaleaf is listed on the Canadian Stock Exchange under the symbol CURA and trades on the OTCQX market under the symbol CURLF. For more information, please visit https://ir.curaleaf.com.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This media advisory contains forward-looking statements and forward-looking information within the meaning of applicable securities laws. These statements relate to future events or future performance. All statements other than statements of historical fact may be forward-looking statements or information. In general, forward-looking statements and information can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “plans”, “expects” or “”, or variations of such words and phrases, or by the use of words or phrases which indicate that certain actions, events or results may, could, would or could occur or be achieved. More particularly and without limitation, this press release contains forward-looking statements and information regarding the business relationship of Curaleaf with Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits and related hemp products. These statements and forward-looking information reflect current beliefs management and are based on assumptions made by and on information currently available to the company with respect to the matter described in this new press release. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, which are based on current expectations as of the date of this press release and are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by these. statements. Additional information on these assumptions and these risks and uncertainties is contained in the section “Risk factors and uncertainties” in the last annual information form of the Company filed. April 28, 2021, which is available under the Company’s SEDAR profile at http://www.sedar.com, and in other documents the Company has filed and may file with the relevant securities authorities in the future. . The forward-looking statements contained herein are made only as of the date of this press release and we assume no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. We caution investors not to place significant reliance on any forward-looking statements contained in this press release. The Canadian Securities Exchange has not reviewed, approved or disapproved of the contents of this press release.

About Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits
Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits is the world’s leading distributor of alcoholic beverages and is proud to be a multigenerational family business. The Company operates in 44 US states, District of Colombia, and Canada. In 2021, Southern Glazer’s was selected as America’s Best Managed Company by Deloitte Private and The Wall Street Journal, as well as named by Newsweek as one of the 100 Most Valued Workplaces. Southern Glazer’s urges all retail customers and adult consumers to responsibly market, sell, serve and enjoy its products. For more information, visit www.southernglazers.com. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @sgwinespirits and on Facebook at Facebook.com/SouthernGlazers.

INVESTOR CONTACT
Curaleaf Holdings, Inc.
Carlos madrazo, SVP Head of IR & Capital Markets
[email protected]

MEDIA CONTACT
Curaleaf Holdings, Inc.
Tracy brady, Vice President of Corporate Communications
[email protected]

SOURCE Curaleaf Holdings, Inc.

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https://www.curaleaf.com


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