Wine production – Vini Vert http://vinivert.com/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 13:47:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://vinivert.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-5-120x120.png Wine production – Vini Vert http://vinivert.com/ 32 32 Why most wine production could be lost in the next 50 years https://vinivert.com/why-most-wine-production-could-be-lost-in-the-next-50-years/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 13:47:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/why-most-wine-production-could-be-lost-in-the-next-50-years/ Dr. Lee Hannah, senior climate change researcher at Conservation International in California, predicted vast shifts in the global wine industry with the publication of his 2013 paper, “Climate change, wine, and conservation,” which included a series of predictive maps. (photo) expressing how, when and where climate change will affect the wine regions of Europe, North […]]]>

Dr. Lee Hannah, senior climate change researcher at Conservation International in California, predicted vast shifts in the global wine industry with the publication of his 2013 paper, “Climate change, wine, and conservation,” which included a series of predictive maps. (photo) expressing how, when and where climate change will affect the wine regions of Europe, North and South America, South Africa and Australia.

At the time, wine insiders disputed its only 30-year timeline, but a decade later, no one is refuting its claims. The paper reports that due to climate change, by 2050 many traditional wine regions across Europe, from the Mediterranean to the North Seas, will become less suitable for growing wine grapes, including the region of Champagne, and the prosperous countries of Spain, Portugal, France and Italy. , and German wine regions. The map (pictured) shows red areas, including most classic wine regions, that will become uninhabitable for grapes. Green areas will remain viable, and blue areas will open up new possibilities and emerging regions. Emerging regions of Canada, England, Scandinavia and China grow wine grapes.

Hannah continues that even amid massive and destructive droughts and fires across California, her famous wine regions, including Napa and Sonoma, will benefit from climate change for now. It won’t last long. Wine grapes only thrive in specific climatic circumstances and need warm, sunny days and cool nights to produce the best fruit, Climate Central. Grapes do not like the slightest fluctuations in temperature norms, water availability and humidity.

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Wine Production Machinery Market Sales to Generate $2.8 Billion Globally by 2026 | by Type, Region https://vinivert.com/wine-production-machinery-market-sales-to-generate-2-8-billion-globally-by-2026-by-type-region/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 11:43:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/wine-production-machinery-market-sales-to-generate-2-8-billion-globally-by-2026-by-type-region/ wine production machinery market Wine Production Machine Market by Type: Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2020-2027 PORTLAND, OR, USA, Aug. 29, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — According to the report, the global wine production machinery industry brought in $2.0 billion in 2019 and is expected to reach $2.83 billion. dollars by 2027, growing at a CAGR […]]]>

wine production machinery market

Wine Production Machine Market by Type: Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2020-2027

PORTLAND, OR, USA, Aug. 29, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — According to the report, the global wine production machinery industry brought in $2.0 billion in 2019 and is expected to reach $2.83 billion. dollars by 2027, growing at a CAGR of 4.2% from 2020 to 2027.

Main determinants of growth

Rising number of wineries, considerable replacement rate in developed markets and increasing consumption of wine globally are driving the growth of the global wine production machinery market. However, capital investments and high maintenance costs are hampering the growth of the market. On the other hand, technological advancements in wine production processes create new opportunities in the coming years.

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The impact of COVID-19 on wine consumption

The wine trade has been impacted by COVID-19 in terms of consumer spending. However, the consumption volume was not impacted much, as wine lovers continued their consumption. However, buyers avoided buying expensive wines and reduced the amount of their purchases. For example, those who bought wine at $60 in the beginning are now buying wine at $30. And, those who originally bought wine for $20 are now buying wine for $10. Buying habits would affect the wine industry as a whole.

Temperature control equipment segment will dominate by 2027

Based on type, the temperature control equipment segment contributed the highest market share in 2019, accounting for nearly two-fifths of the global wine production machinery market, and is expected to maintain its leading position. during the forecast period. This is attributed to its vital role in the production of quality wine as well as the implementation of automated equipment which eliminates the need for employees to control and monitor the equipment. However, crushing and pressing equipment is estimated to experience the highest CAGR of 4.5% from 2020 to 2027. The research also analyzes segments such as tanks and fermenters, filtration equipment and others.

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North America will see the fastest growth by 2027

By region, North America is expected to maintain the highest CAGR of 5.2% from 2020 to 2027, due to the increase in the number of wineries in the United States over the past decade and the increase in wine consumption by the millennial population. However, Europe contributed more than three-fifths of the global wine production machinery market in 2019 and is expected to retain its lion’s share during the forecast period. This is attributed to increased demand from export markets and increased investment by wine producers in production-enhancing machinery. The research also analyzes regions including Asia-Pacific and LAMEA.

Market players grab the biggest pie

GW KENT
Agrovine
Della Toffola Pacific
Love Brewing Ltd.
Northern Brewer
Adamark’s Airknife
Company Paul Müller
Vitikit Limited
Tanium Machinery
VeCriveller Group

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Drought is wreaking havoc on Tuscany’s famed olive oil and wine production https://vinivert.com/drought-is-wreaking-havoc-on-tuscanys-famed-olive-oil-and-wine-production/ Mon, 22 Aug 2022 09:01:07 +0000 https://vinivert.com/drought-is-wreaking-havoc-on-tuscanys-famed-olive-oil-and-wine-production/ Farmers in Tuscany, the heart of Italy’s wine and olive oil industry, are battling to save as much of this year’s harvest as possible from the ravages of drought and heatwave. The lack of rainfall since spring has affected even plants that traditionally thrive in hot, dry conditions. In San Casciano in Val di Pesa, […]]]>

Farmers in Tuscany, the heart of Italy’s wine and olive oil industry, are battling to save as much of this year’s harvest as possible from the ravages of drought and heatwave.

The lack of rainfall since spring has affected even plants that traditionally thrive in hot, dry conditions.

In San Casciano in Val di Pesa, near Florence, olive trees dot the picture-book hillsides, but the soil parched by the scorching sun doesn’t produce enough fruit. “The climatic problems had a decisive influence,” said olive grower Filippo Legnaioli.

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“We had a very dry spring with hardly any rain from March to today and this happened at a crucial moment in the transition from flower to fruit,” added Legnaioli, president of the local cooperative “Frantoio Grevepese “.

Without water, many flowers fall to the ground before they can bear fruit. And with few olives on the branches, even the sparse harvest becomes an economic headache. According to Legnaioli, this year’s oil production could be reduced by 50-60%.

Special remedies

Other olive growers have decided to change their cultivation methods, opting for a supplemental irrigation system that can offset the effect of drought and scorching heat.” This year we are using irrigation, say, “of relief” to protect the production of olives on the plants while they were on traditional olive trees, unfortunately the high temperatures and the drought lead to the loss of many olives,” explained farmer Luigi Calonaci.

The system works through a black tube that has been put in place under the trees and which spouts out small amounts of water. The Calonaci farm has also chosen to use white netting to protect the plants from olive fruit flies whose larvae feed on the fruit of the trees, a problem that is not directly related to drought but can cause a big loss of performance.

The effects of climate change not only impact production and plants, but even alter the geography and rhythms of the Italian agricultural landscape. A few years ago, olive groves were mainly the prerogative of historically hot and arid regions like Sicily. Now regions such as Valle d’Aosta in the far north of Italy, famous for its ski resorts and mountains, can produce their own oil.

Early harvest

Not only the heat and the lack of rain, but the climate change also affects the schedules and the properties of the wine. In Castellina in Chianti, September is normally the month of the grape harvest, as in the whole country. But with extreme and prolonged high temperatures, the bunches of grapes ripen earlier than expected.

“We have smaller grapes and expect grape counts to be lower than the average for recent years, probably in line with last year,” the consortium’s vice president told Reuters. Chianti Classico”, Sergio Zingarelli. In the Chianti region, one of the most famous for wine production, in addition to a reduction in grapes, winegrowers also have to deal with extreme weather events that do not quench the soil’s thirst but damage the crops.” Extreme weather phenomena are getting stronger and stronger,” said Paolo Cianferoni, owner of the “Caparsa” winery.

“A few weeks ago, a hailstorm destroyed 40% of the grapes here. Fortunately, the quality of the grapes was not affected, so we will see what happens.

News by Reuters, edited by Hospitality Ireland. Click on subscribe to register for Hospitality Ireland printed edition.

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Corollary Unveils Plans to Become Oregon’s First Exclusively Sparkling Wine Estate https://vinivert.com/corollary-unveils-plans-to-become-oregons-first-exclusively-sparkling-wine-estate/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/corollary-unveils-plans-to-become-oregons-first-exclusively-sparkling-wine-estate/ The new Eola-Amity site will see the light of day in the spring of 2023, with approximately 8 plantable hectares between 180 and 230 meters above sea level. Adding to the elevation, the property sits just in the way of the Van Duzer Corridor. The gap in Oregon’s Coast Range allows for a cool flow […]]]>

The new Eola-Amity site will see the light of day in the spring of 2023, with approximately 8 plantable hectares between 180 and 230 meters above sea level. Adding to the elevation, the property sits just in the way of the Van Duzer Corridor. The gap in Oregon’s Coast Range allows for a cool flow of Pacific air, which tempers the hot summer heat each afternoon – making the Willamette Valley as hospitable as he is to grapes like Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

The new vineyards of the Corollary estate will be planted in four Champagne varieties; Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier, Pinot Blanc and Chardonnay. As the property was previously used for timber harvesting, it presents a blank canvas for viticulture. Diephouse and Feldkamp will work with a local vineyard management company to explore rootstocksvariety of clones and row orientation.

They aim to plant and grow the fruits best suited for sparkling wine production and share those lessons with the Willamette Valley wine community. The vineyards of the estate will be conducted in permaculture and regenerator agricultural principles.

The Corollary Wines duo began considering the possibilities of sparkling wine in Oregon after the cooler-than-average 2011 vintage, which saw sparkling wines begin to appear in more tasting rooms or wine club offerings. Willamette Valley wine. “Argyle has been leading the charge when it comes to sparkling wine here in the Willamette for a long time, but the 2011 vintage has seen a resurgence in popularity across the valley,” Diephouse said.

Perhaps most importantly, in 2014 Andrew Davis started Radiant Sparkling Wine Company in the Willamette Valley town of McMinnville, bringing the expensive and specialized equipment needed to make sparkling wines to the many small wineries across the valley.

This industry growth created a larger sample size that convinced Diephouse and Feldkamp, ​​born near Beaverton, Oregon, that the varieties that have been successful in Champagne could perform well in the sites. fresh from the Willamette Valley. The couple moved from the Bay Area of ​​California and started making sparkling wine at Corollary in 2017.

Corollary Wines will relocate production to the new property with plans to develop a tasting room and winery facilities on the estate in 2024.


Related Articles

New Oregon wine appellation ‘Mount Pisgah’ is created

Southern Oregon: regional profile and wines to taste

Oregon Chardonnay: the best producers to know and the wines to taste

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French wine production set to rebound after 2021 freeze https://vinivert.com/french-wine-production-set-to-rebound-after-2021-freeze/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/french-wine-production-set-to-rebound-after-2021-freeze/ French wine production is set to rebound in 2022 after last year’s spring frosts led to “historically low” production levels. But ongoing drought issues could still affect volumes, the country’s agriculture ministry said. Devastating spring frosts and heavy rain last summer ravaged vineyards in France, leading the country’s agriculture ministry to predict one of the […]]]>

French wine production is set to rebound in 2022 after last year’s spring frosts led to “historically low” production levels. But ongoing drought issues could still affect volumes, the country’s agriculture ministry said.

Devastating spring frosts and heavy rain last summer ravaged vineyards in France, leading the country’s agriculture ministry to predict one of the worst production levels in history at the time.

French Agriculture Minister Julien Denormandie described the frosts as “probably the biggest agricultural disaster of the early 21st century”.

The picture is a little rosier this year, with the French Ministry of Agriculture anticipating a rebound in production levels of between 13 and 21% (between 42.6 million and 45.6 million hectolitres).

Despite the hailstorms and extreme temperatures seen in France in June and July, the majority of the country experienced favorable weather conditions compared to last year.

“Under these conditions, production is tending to increase compared to last year in all wine regions, with the exception of Charentes”, specifies the ministry.

“However, dry soils combined with heat waves could limit this increase if they persist until harvest.”

While the hot, dry weather has reduced the risk of vine disease and should lead to earlier harvests, drought is affecting grapes in Alsace and Languedoc-Roussillon. It could also dampen production levels in Burgundy, the ministry said.

Bordeaux production should fall below the five-year average due to frost and hail damage.

But there is positive news from Champagne, where a good harvest is expected with levels above the five-year average, according to the ministry.

As hailstorms and drought present an ongoing challenge for French winegrowers, the Ministry of Agriculture has unveiled a set of measures to help winegrowers and grape growers affected by the capricious weather conditions.

Marc Fesneau, Minister of Agriculture and Food announced the new measures on August 3 during a press conference.

“These seven recommendations, resulting from field analyses, provide immediate and concrete responses both to support farmers affected by spring hailstorms and also to improve the resilience of our agriculture,” he said.

“[They] complete the structuring projects initiated by the Government, such as the reform of harvest insurance or the France 2030 plan, with 2.8 billion euros to support and develop the solutions of tomorrow, in particular to better prepare us for climatic hazards.

You can find out more about the actions taken to help winegrowers here.

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How France’s drought is affecting the country’s wine production – Robb Report https://vinivert.com/how-frances-drought-is-affecting-the-countrys-wine-production-robb-report/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/how-frances-drought-is-affecting-the-countrys-wine-production-robb-report/ After going through a Dijon mustard crisis earlier this year, France could soon face a dwindling supply of vino. Wine yields look fragile as scorching heat waves continue to parch the French countryside. Production in France was actually expected to rebound this year after a frost-induced decline in 2021, but the prolonged drought could now […]]]>

After going through a Dijon mustard crisis earlier this year, France could soon face a dwindling supply of vino.

Wine yields look fragile as scorching heat waves continue to parch the French countryside. Production in France was actually expected to rebound this year after a frost-induced decline in 2021, but the prolonged drought could now dampen volumes, Reuters reports.

The country’s agriculture ministry initially predicted Gallic wine production would increase by 13-21% to between 42.6 million and 45.6 million hectolitres. For the uninitiated, one hectoliter is about 22 gallons (100 liters) or 133 standard bottles of wine. Indeed, many regions experienced milder weather this year than last year for the flowering of the vines, with the exception of certain parts of the south-west which were hit by frost and hail.

“Under these conditions, production tends to increase compared to last year in all wine regions, with the exception of Charentes,” the ministry said in a report. “However, dry soils combined with heat waves could limit this increase if they persist until harvest.”

A Bordeaux winemaker shows bunches of grapes burned by the heat wave and the drought.

Getty

Although dry and hot weather this year reduced disease pressure on vines and boosted an early harvest, the worst drought on record in the country affected grapes in regions such as Alsace in the east and Languedoc-Roussillon in the extreme south-west. It has also started to impact harvest potential in Burgundy, according to the ministry.

Production in Bordeaux is also expected to fall below the five-year average after the harsh winter damaged around 10,000 hectares of vines, the ministry added. Conversely, Champagne is expecting a good harvest, with an estimated production higher than the five-year average. The final yield depends on the drought, of course.

Despite all the misfortune and sadness, the drought may have a reluctant winner: salt producers in the Guérande region are heading for record production, as Reuters reports. The so-called “white gold” is sold in the United States for over $100 per kilo (2.2 pounds).

Maybe there is a silver (or white) heat lining.

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Drought is wreaking havoc on Tuscany’s famed olive oil and wine production https://vinivert.com/drought-is-wreaking-havoc-on-tuscanys-famed-olive-oil-and-wine-production-2/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/drought-is-wreaking-havoc-on-tuscanys-famed-olive-oil-and-wine-production-2/ Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register SAN CASCIANO IN VAL DI PESA, Italy, Aug 3 (Reuters) – Farmers in Tuscany, the heart of Italy’s prized wine and olive oil industry, are battling to save as much of the harvest as possible from this year of the ravages of drought and heat waves. […]]]>

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

SAN CASCIANO IN VAL DI PESA, Italy, Aug 3 (Reuters) – Farmers in Tuscany, the heart of Italy’s prized wine and olive oil industry, are battling to save as much of the harvest as possible from this year of the ravages of drought and heat waves.

The lack of rainfall since spring has affected even plants that traditionally thrive in hot, dry conditions.

In San Casciano in Val di Pesa, near Florence, olive trees dot the picture-book hillsides, but the soil parched by the scorching sun doesn’t produce enough fruit. “The climatic problems had a decisive influence,” said olive grower Filippo Legnaioli.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

“We had a very dry spring with hardly any rain from March to today and this happened at a crucial moment in the transition from flower to fruit,” added Legnaioli, president of the local cooperative “Frantoio Grevepese “.

Without water, many flowers fall to the ground before they can bear fruit. And with few olives on the branches, even the sparse harvest becomes an economic headache. According to Legnaioli, this year’s oil production could be reduced by 50-60%.

SPECIAL RECOURSES

Other olive growers have decided to change their cultivation methods, opting for a supplemental irrigation system that can offset the effect of drought and scorching heat. “This year we are using, let’s say, ‘relief’ irrigation to protect the olive production on the plants while on the traditional olive trees, unfortunately high temperatures and drought are causing the loss of many olives,” explained farmer Luigi Calonaci.

The system works through a black tube that has been put in place under the trees and which spouts out small amounts of water. The Calonaci farm has also chosen to use white netting to protect the plants from olive fruit flies whose larvae feed on the fruit of the trees, a problem that is not directly related to drought but can cause a big loss of performance.

The effects of climate change not only impact production and plants, but even alter the geography and rhythms of the Italian agricultural landscape. A few years ago, olive groves were mainly the prerogative of historically hot and arid regions like Sicily. Now regions such as Valle d’Aosta in the far north of Italy, famous for its ski resorts and mountains, can produce their own oil.

EARLY HARVEST

Not only the heat and the lack of rain, but the climate change also affects the schedules and the properties of the wine. In Castellina in Chianti, September is normally the month of the grape harvest, as in the whole country. But with extreme and prolonged high temperatures, the bunches of grapes ripen earlier than expected.

“We have smaller grapes and expect grape counts to be lower than the average for recent years, probably in line with last year,” the consortium’s vice president told Reuters. Chianti Classico”, Sergio Zingarelli. In the Chianti region, one of the most famous for wine production, in addition to a reduction in grapes, winegrowers also have to deal with extreme weather events that do not quench the soil’s thirst but damage the cultures. “Extreme weather phenomena are getting stronger and stronger,” said Paolo Cianferoni, owner of the “Caparsa” winery.

“A few weeks ago, a hailstorm destroyed 40% of the grapes here. Fortunately, the quality of the grapes was not affected, so we will see what happens.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Reporting by Matteo Berlenga, Writing by Fabiano Franchitti Editing by Emily Roe, Keith Weir and Jane Merriman

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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3 entrepreneurs seek to create wine production units | Lucknow News https://vinivert.com/3-entrepreneurs-seek-to-create-wine-production-units-lucknow-news/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 22:06:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/3-entrepreneurs-seek-to-create-wine-production-units-lucknow-news/ Lucknow: Three entrepreneurs each from Muzaffarnagar, Bareli and Lucknow have expressed interest in establishing vineyards in Uttar Pradesh.The excise The department examines the proposals and is likely to issue the authorization to these contractors within fifteen days. To increase farmers’ income and promote agro-tourism, the government of Uttar Pradesh introduced the V-1 license in the […]]]>
Lucknow: Three entrepreneurs each from Muzaffarnagar, Bareli and Lucknow have expressed interest in establishing vineyards in Uttar Pradesh.
The excise The department examines the proposals and is likely to issue the authorization to these contractors within fifteen days.
To increase farmers’ income and promote agro-tourism, the government of Uttar Pradesh introduced the V-1 license in the current fiscal year. The V-1 license will allow winemakers to begin producing wine in the state.
Additional Chief Secretary, Excise Department, Sanjay Bhoosreddy said: “Our officials are working on this front. We have already received a few initial proposals and are in contact with entrepreneurs to support them.
During the development of the policy, in its memo to the government, the Excise Department had highlighted the large amount of fruit wastage. “Almost 40% of the products are wasted in UP because the supply chain is not so strong now,” an officer said.
While the department has decided not to levy any tax on the sale of locally produced wine for five years, large orchard owners and organic farming actors, already engaged in ecotourism, are showing up to open a winery .
Anil Kumar Sawhney, who runs Godson Organic Farm in Bareli, and Madhvendra Deo Singh, who runs Madhav Udyan in the Mal area in Lucknow, have come up with an elaborate plan to promote wine tourism and said their units should be operational d a year from now. .
“We are going to open a wine shop and offer a wine village tourism concept in Bareli. We will also obtain the required certificates from regulatory authorities to ensure that our wines are produced organically,” Sawhney said.
Singh, on the other hand, said he was going to produce wine from the finest quality mangoes from Mal and Malihabad. “We will call it golden wine. We also plan to open a homestay or resort on the property. We have an 80 acre mango orchard off the IIM Lucknow road and work has started there,” Singh said.
excise commissioner Senthil C Pandien said: “We had recently held a launch session for interested players in Lucknow. We have identified consultants who can set up a winery by processing mango, guava, lychee and other pulpy fruits grown in UP.
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Study predicts growth in UK wine production due to climate change https://vinivert.com/study-predicts-growth-in-uk-wine-production-due-to-climate-change/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/study-predicts-growth-in-uk-wine-production-due-to-climate-change/ New research appears to reveal how climate change is likely to boost the potential for wine production in the UK – with conditions set to resemble those in famous wine-growing regions of France and Germany. Over the past 20 years, climate change has contributed to a growth in UK vineyard acreage – with over 800 […]]]>

New research appears to reveal how climate change is likely to boost the potential for wine production in the UK – with conditions set to resemble those in famous wine-growing regions of France and Germany.

Over the past 20 years, climate change has contributed to a growth in UK vineyard acreage – with over 800 vineyards now – and award-winning wine production, as well as a shift in wine style towards sparkling wines.

This latest study, by a team of researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA), the London School of Economics, Vinescapes Ltd and Weatherquest Ltd, attempted to paint a picture of the sector’s potential over the next 20 years. Drawing on the latest detailed climate projections, the group believes it has developed a cutting-edge capability to model and map the best opportunities for viticulture and winemaking in the UK.

Their conclusions, published on July 8 in the journal OENO Oneshow how the climate of more of England and Wales should become suitable for the reliable cultivation of sparkling wine varietals, and how the potential for producing high quality still wines is rapidly emerging.

UEA lead researcher Professor Steve Dorling, from the School of Environmental Science and forecasting firm Weatherquest Ltd, said: “We have seen viticulture in the UK expand by nearly by 400%, from 761 to 3,800 hectares between 2004 and 2021.

“During this period, global warming has allowed much more reliable yield and quality of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes – these grapes are blended in the production of champagne-style sparkling wine.

“Hot and dry growing seasons in the UK like 2018, with below average disease problems in the vines, led to the production of a record 15.6 million bottles and these growing conditions are already become and should become more common.”

The Climate Resilience in the UK Wine Sector (CREWS-UK) project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council under the UK Climate Resilience Programme. The researchers looked at how often growing conditions in the UK are expected to climatically resemble those seen more recently in the famous sparkling and still wine producing regions of France’s Champagne and Burgundy regions, and in Baden. in Germany.

Their findings highlight that since the 1980s there has already been warming of more than 1°C during the growing season across much of south-east and east England, a change that has been one of the main catalysts for growth and variety change in the UK. viticulture sector during this period.

The study’s lead author, Dr Alistair Nesbitt, of vineyard and vineyard consultancy Vinescapes Ltd, said: “This work is a first in the UK, a unique combination of climate change science, viticulture and wine expertise.

“We have found that significant areas in England and Wales are projected to warm by 2040 by up to an additional 1.4°C during the growing season. This expands the area of ​​suitability of Pinot Noir for the production of sparkling wine, but also new areas will open up in the range of suitability of growing season temperatures for the production of still Pinot Noir and for the cultivation of varieties such as Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Sémillon and others more resistant to disease. varieties, which are hardly grown in the UK at present.

“Additionally, anyone considering investing in a vineyard in the UK can now benefit from this knowledge through advice on the best locations, both now and under future conditions of climate change.”

The team used the UK Climate Projections 2018 scenarios to assess the future suitability of grape varieties and wine styles in the UK, as well as the potential for investment in viticulture, sector adaptation and resilience on the period 2021-2040.

Regions of East Anglia, Lincolnshire, South Central England, North East Wales and coastal areas of South West England and South Wales are expected to experience the 2018 “conditions” between 2021 and 2040 in 60-75% of the years, which means that the exceptional 2018 vintage will become more common.

Meanwhile, large areas of South East and East England are expected to come into a suitable range for the production of still red Pinot Noir. While Pinot Noir for sparkling wine is already grown successfully in the UK, predicted increases in growing season temperature now indicate a new and growing opportunity for still Pinot Noir production in some areas.

Dr Nesbitt said: “We have shown that in parts of the UK the exceptional 2018 vintage will become the norm, and that the Champagne region grape growing temperatures from 1999 to 2018 are expected to occur in a expanding area of ​​England between 2021 and 2040. . In some years, a few regions of the UK may see growing season climates similar to those that have contributed to the best recent Champagne vintages, as well as increased potential for Burgundy and Baden style still red wines.

However, the researchers warn that significant challenges remain, arguing that the rapidly changing UK climate is forcing the industry to remain nimble and not ‘lock in’ to production that cannot adapt to changing conditions. growing conditions.

Professor Dorling said: “The UK wine sector is going through exciting times, but our findings have underscored the challenge of establishing wine identities and brands, particularly those closely associated with wine varieties and styles, in a climate rapidly evolving.

Additionally, UK weather can still be unpredictable, as demonstrated by the 2012 vintage when much of the UK grape production was lost due to the cool and very wet flowering period. Year-to-year climate variability will persist, including early season frost risk, although longer-term trends are good.

Sustainable investment decisions in vineyards and wineries will also require careful analysis of all risks related to the growing environment and the market.

Dr Nesbitt said: “Through our consultancy services, our teams at Vinescapes and Weatherquest enjoy supporting the sustainable growth of the UK wine sector and we are extremely grateful to WineGB, the industry body, for facilitating everything. the commitment we have had with viticulture. and wine producers throughout the CREWS-UK project.

‘Climate change projections for UK viticulture to 2040: a focus onmproving suitability for Pinot Noir’, Alistair Nesbitt et al, is published in OENO One July 8.

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Climate change is likely to increase the potential for wine production https://vinivert.com/climate-change-is-likely-to-increase-the-potential-for-wine-production/ Mon, 11 Jul 2022 14:19:00 +0000 https://vinivert.com/climate-change-is-likely-to-increase-the-potential-for-wine-production/ A new study reveals how climate change is increasing wine production capacity in the UK. This has conditions which, according to projections, resemble those of the well-known cultivation regions of Germany and France. Image Credit: Gill Copeland/Shutterstock.com Over the past two decades, climate change has resulted in an increase in UK vineyard acreage with over […]]]>

A new study reveals how climate change is increasing wine production capacity in the UK. This has conditions which, according to projections, resemble those of the well-known cultivation regions of Germany and France.

Image Credit: Gill Copeland/Shutterstock.com

Over the past two decades, climate change has resulted in an increase in UK vineyard acreage with over 800 vineyards and award-winning wine production, as well as a shift in wine style towards sparkling wines .

Currently, a research group from the University of East Anglia (UEA), London School of Economics, Vinescapes Ltd and Weatherquest Ltd have charted the potential of the sector over the next two decades. Drawing on the latest elaborate climate projections, they have developed state-of-the-art potential to model and map the best odds for viticulture and winemaking in the UK.

Their findings were recently reported in the journal OENO Oneshowing how the climate of a greater region of England and Wales should prove ideal for reliably growing sparkling wine varietals, and how the capacity for high quality still wine production is rapidly emerging.

We have seen viticulture in the UK expand by nearly 400%, from 761 to 3,800 hectares between 2004 and 2021.. During this period, global warming has supported a much more reliable yield and quality of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes – these grapes are blended in the production of Champagne-style sparkling wine..

Steve Dorling, Study Principal Investigator and Professor, School of Environmental Science, University of East Anglia

Dorling also associated with forecasting company Weatherquest Ltd added: “Hot and dry growing seasons in the UK like 2018, with below average disease problems in the vines, led to the production of a record 15.6 million bottles and these growing conditions are already have become and should become more common..”

The Climate Resilience in the UK Wine Sector (CREWS-UK) project has been financially supported by the Natural Environment Research Council under the UK Climate Resilience Program.

The researchers took into account how often growing conditions in the UK were projected to climatically match those seen recently in the most famous sparkling and still wine producing regions of France’s Burgundy and Champagne regions, and in Baden, Germany.

Their results highlight that from the 1980s there has already been a warming of more than 1°C at the time of the growing season in much of south-east and east England. It was a change that was one of the main catalysts for growth and varietal change in the UK wine sector during this period.

This work is a first in the UK, a unique combination of climate change science, viticulture and viticultural expertise. We found that significant areas in England and Wales are projected to warm by 2040 by up to an additional 1.4°C during the growing season.

Dr Alistair Nesbitt, Study Lead Author, Vineyard and Winery Consultancy Vinescapes Ltd

Nesbitt continued:This expands the area of ​​suitability of Pinot Noir for the production of sparkling wine, but also new areas will open up in the range of suitability of growing season temperatures for the production of still Pinot Noir and for the cultivation of varieties such as Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Sémillon and others more resistant to disease. varieties, which are hardly grown in the UK at present.”

Additionally, anyone considering investing in a vineyard in the UK can now benefit from this knowledge through advice on the best locations, both current and future under the conditions of climate change.added Nesbitt.

The research team used the UK Climate Projections 2018 scenarios to assess the future suitability of wine variety and style in the UK, as well as the potential for winery investment, sector adaptation and climate resilience. beyond the 2021-2040 period.

Regions of East Anglia, South Central England, Lincolnshire, North East Wales and coastal areas of South West England and South Wales are expected to experience the “ conditions” of 2018 between 2021 and 2040 in 60 to 75% of the years. This implies that the unusual 2018 vintage will become very common.

At the same time, large areas of South East and East England are expected to fall into an ideal range for the production of still red Pinot Noir. Already, while Pinot Noir for sparkling wine is being grown successfully in the UK, projected increases in seasonal temperatures currently point to the new and growing opportunity for still Pinot Noir production in a few regions.

We have shown that in parts of the UK the exceptional 2018 vintage will become the norm and that Champagne region grape growing temperatures from 1999 to 2018 are expected to occur in an expanding region of England between 2021 and 2040.

Dr Alistair Nesbitt, Study Lead Author, Vineyard and Winery Consultancy Vinescapes Ltd

Nesbitt added:In some years, a few regions of the UK may see growing season climates similar to those that have contributed to the best recent Champagne vintages, as well as increased potential for Burgundy and Baden style still red wines..”

Researchers warn that there are still many hurdles to overcome, arguing that the industry must remain flexible and not ‘lock in’ production that cannot adapt to changing growing conditions due to rapidly changing market conditions. British climate.

Professor Dorling said: “Exciting times lie ahead for the UK wine sector, but our findings have underscored the challenge of establishing wine identities and brands, particularly those closely associated with wine varieties and styles, in a climate rapidly evolving..”

UK weather can still be erratic, as illustrated by the 2012 vintage when much of the UK grape production was lost due to the cool and very wet flowering period. Year-to-year climate variability will tend to continue, such as early season frost risk, even if longer-term trends are considered good.

Furthermore, sustainable investment decisions in vineyards and wineries will always require careful analysis of all threats to the growth environment and the market.

Dr Nesbitt said: “Through our consultancy services, our Vinescapes and Weatherquest teams enjoy supporting the sustainable growth of the UK wine sector and we are extremely grateful to WineGB, the industry body, for facilitating all engagement that we have had with grape growers and wine producers around the world. the CREWS-UK project.”

Journal reference:

Nesbitt, A. and Al. (2022) Climate change projections for UK viticulture to 2040: a focus on improving the suitability of Pinot noir. OENO A. doi.org/10.20870/oeno-one.2022.56.3.5398.

Source: https://www.uea.ac.uk/

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